Council closes walking tracks during aerial spraying for mozzies


In response to heavy rain earlier in the week, Redland City Council will close some of its walking tracks at Victoria Point and Wellington Point on Friday morning, 22 January 2021, to conduct an aerial treatment of mosquito breeding sites.

Mayor Karen Williams said the larger additional treatment will target both freshwater and saltwater areas.

“A number of freshwater mosquito breeding sites have been inundated, particularly around Wellington Point, Victoria Point and Mount Cotton, causing mosquito larvae to breed in these areas,” she said.

“Council’s Pest Management Team decided to conduct the aerial treatment to target the mosquito larvae in these areas ahead of the Australia Day weekend.

“This is the first time Council has closed walking tracks to undertake mosquito spraying, but it was considered advisable due to the extent of the treatment.

“There is no danger to people, animals or the environment because of the treatment.

“It will be conducted with methoprene, which is a mosquito target-specific product that only kills mosquito larvae.”

The aerial spraying will encompass more than 100 hectares of additional freshwater breeding sites and is expected to occur between 8am and 12pm on Friday 22 January, weather permitting.

Walking tracks to close during this time are at:

  • Geoff Skinner Wetlands Reserve, Blight Street, Wellington Point
  • Point Halloran Conservation Reserve, boardwalk entry at School Road and Orana Street Victoria Point.

Signs have been placed in these areas, and the tracks will reopen as soon as the aerial treatment has been completed.

Regional Mosquito Management Group chairman Cr Paul Golle said while Council would continue to conduct ground and aerial treatments to manage mosquito numbers, it was also important for residents to take a proactive approach and check their backyards for possible breeding sites.

“Mosquitoes can be found breeding even in small amounts of water so residents are encouraged to empty pooling water from items around the yard such as pot plant bases, blocked roof gutters, bird baths, sagging tarps or covers and old tyres,” Cr Golle said.

“People can protect themselves by using insect repellents, maintaining fly screens on windows and doors, and using mosquito coils or plug-in insecticide burners.”