Native orchids strike a pose right across Redlands Coast


Redlands Coast has been putting on an unexpected display of late, with recent rain resulting in bumper flowering of native orchids.

Mayor Karen Williams said Redlands Coast was home to a number of Australia’s 1200 species of native orchids, many of which were not found in any other countries.

“The largest local mass flowerings in 10 years have recently been observed by Redland City Council officers who support and regularly visit local properties participating in the Land For Wildlife program,” Cr Williams said.

Slender hyacinth orchid, Dipodium variegatum

“Often orchid plants can be difficult to find and get overlooked, so such a spectacular and broad flowering event provides a great chance to rediscover orchids that have been dormant.

“We’re encouraging all Redlands Coast residents and visitors to keep an eye out for these beauties while bushwalking or otherwise enjoying our conservation areas.

“If you suspect you’ve found one, please take a photo and send it to our team, who can help you identify it.”

Division 6 Councillor Julie Talty said she was delighted to learn of the abundance of flowering orchids found on a Land for Wildlife property in Redland Bay with the help of young nature-lover Emily Wilkinson.

Emily Wilkinson with a flowering dipodium variegatum orchid found on her family’s Redland Bay property

“I hear Emily was keen to show our Environmental Partnerships team member around her property while undertaking her own nature treasure hunt,” Cr Talty said.

Councillor Williams said that, as a free voluntary program, Land For Wildlife encouraged and assisted private landholders such as Emily’s family to enhance habitats for native plants and animals on their properties.

“While supported locally by Council, the regionally coordinated program has just registered its 5000th participant in south east Queensland.”

“Your property can still be primarily managed for other purposes while reaping the benefits of the Land For Wildlife Program.”

To find out whether Land For Wildlife or one of our other Environmental Partnership Programs could benefit you and your property, visit indigiscapes.com.au or email environmentalpartnerships@redland.qld.gov.au.

Five finger orchid, Calandenia catenata

Send your native orchid photograph into Council for ID

Email environmentalpartnerships@redland.qld.gov.au with your photograph and details of where it was found but please don’t pick or dig it up.

Native orchids are protected by law and if you take them out of their natural environment they are unlikely to survive.