Council raises awareness of safe cycling on Redlands Coast


Redland City Council is rolling out an awareness campaign to promote safe cycling across Redlands Coast.

Mayor Karen Williams said the Ride Redlands Coast campaign aligned with commitments in Council’s Corporate Plan 2021-2026 and Redlands Coast Transport Strategy 2020 to deliver positive active transport outcomes across the city.

“Council has also demonstrated its commitment to cycling, and other forms of active travel, through the recent establishment of the Redlands Coast Active Travel Group,” she said.

“Redlands Coast has a great recreational cycling culture with hundreds of kilometres of tracks and pathways.

“Through the Ride Redlands Coast campaign we want to promote cycling as an easy and enjoyable way to travel, exercise and experience some of our many naturally wonderful attractions while promoting a healthy lifestyle.

“We will also be reinforcing safety messages such as the importance of wearing a helmet, using a bell and checking brakes.”

State Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey said the Queensland Government was supporting the campaign through their $252 million investment between 2021–22 and 2024–25 to design, build and maintain cycling infrastructure and fund programs to encourage more people to ride bikes.

“We know when people ride more often it makes our transport system more sustainable, helps us maintain a healthy environment and a more active lifestyle,” Mr Bailey said.

“We’re very pleased to be working with local government to encourage more cycling, more often through campaigns like Ride Redlands Coast.”

Redlands Coast Active Travel Group chair and Division 2 Councillor Peter Mitchell said that as well as the citywide promotion, Council would undertake a targeted campaign in Thornlands and Victoria Point to increase awareness of a raised priority crossing near Pinklands Sporting Complex.

“Council initiatives to encourage active travel include improving cycling and pedestrian facilities, and one example is a new type of raised priority crossing which prioritises pathway users,” Cr Mitchell said.

“The crossings are constructed on a raised platform which increases visibility and reduces vehicle speeds, while providing a safe, direct route for both pedestrians and cyclists.

“The result, we hope, is more active travellers, which is why they are ideal in areas where we want people to cycle more.

“The raised priority crossing at Pinklands is the first to be constructed on Redlands Coast but we are expecting them to become more prevalent.”

Division 3 Councillor Paul Golle said the Pinklands crossing was on a key cycling route.

“The crossing is on an access road off busy Cleveland-Redland Bay Road and is a very visible reminder to motorists to slow down and give way to cyclists and other pathway users,” Cr Golle said.

As part of the Ride Redlands Coast campaign, Council is also conducting an online survey to gather data on cycling in the city and opportunities to improve access and safety. The survey is available on Council’s Your Say webpage.

The campaign will be promoted on social media, and the targeted campaign will include a letter box drop and engagement with local schools in close proximity to the new raised priority crossing.

More information, including cycling safety fact sheets and a video, is available on Council’s Your Say site.

The Ride Redlands Coast campaign has been supported through the Queensland Government’s Cycle Network Local Government Grants program.