Author Archives: Gerard (Redland City Council)

Victoria Point planning outcomes reflect Court negotiated settlement of planning interests


Redland City Council is continuing its push to secure the best planning outcomes for a new emerging community in Victoria Point while navigating a complex planning and appeal system.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council was committed to delivering a well-planned and co-ordinated approach to the development of this significant future growth area.

“This includes Council representing the community in recent Court appeals on planning interests in the area, including the area around Clay Gully.

“Council’s approach is outlined in the draft South West Victoria Point Local Plan (draft local plan) it submitted to State Government in November 2019 for State Interest Review and which is yet to receive Ministerial approval for us to then go on to public consultation.”

The local plan area is approximately 175 hectares and is situated between Bunker Road and Brendan Way in the north, Clay Gully Road and Cleveland-Redland Bay Road in the east, Double Jump Road in the south and Little Eprapah Creek in the west.

“The planning commitment for this area is for a well-planned urban community, integrating all necessary components of the built and natural environments in an orderly, and coordinated land use pattern,” Cr Williams said.

“Council’s planning process undertaken for the area has been a key contributor to these efforts.

“Since 2015, Council has received a number of properly made development applications over sites within the local plan area.

“In early 2018, Council resolved to defer its decision on development applications in the area until the structure plan was in place and the Government gave a clear commitment to funding the vital infrastructure required for the area’s future growth.

“As no decision was made on these deferred development applications within the statutory timeframe, seven of the applicants subsequently lodged an appeal in the Planning and Environment Court arguing for their own plans for the area.

“With the support of the Draft Structure Plan and experts, Council has represented the community’s interests through the appeal proceedings to ensure a co-ordinated approach to development.

“Even though approximately 40 per cent of the local plan area is captured by the three Court judgements that have been handed down in recent months, Council will continue to fight on behalf of the community for better outcomes as there is still much to gain by having an adopted local plan.

“Local area planning ensures a co-ordinated approach to the area’s development is undertaken to achieve the desired vision for the area.

“It will help ensure environmental values and corridors are protected and that infrastructure networks are co-ordinated and effectively delivered within the area.

“On completion of the State Interest Review and Ministerial approval to proceed to public consultation, the draft local plan will be publicly notified on our Redlands Coast Your Say website.”

“In the meantime, Council will continue to represent the community during the appeals that are ongoing but confidentiality provisions mean Council is unable to comment further on those matters still before the courts.”

Following Court judgment on one of the settled appeals, Council has approved an operational works development permit for earthworks to begin in the Clay Gully area.  Council understands that these works will commence very shortly.

More information on the South West Victoria Point local plan is available on the Redlands Coast Your Say page (link).

 

Council calls for interest in new Active Travel Group membership.


Redland City Council is calling for community input to help build an active and healthy Redlands Coast.

Mayor Karen Williams said the expression of interest (EOI) process for membership of the Redlands Coast Active Travel Group was designed to allow the new group to convene from mid-2021.

“Our aim is to identify organisations and individuals who can help us build a more connected, active and healthy Redlands Coast,” Cr Williams said.

“Active travel can help to encourage community-friendly public spaces, improve productivity, health and wellbeing.

“It can also contribute to reducing the burden of parking and transport infrastructure dominated by cars.

“We are looking to the new group members’ advocacy and passion to help drive and support active travel and transport infrastructure and innovation.

“We want our organisation and the Redlands Coast community to be an example of an environmentally sustainable and transport-resilient community.”

Chair of the new Active Travel Group, Division 2 Councillor Peter Mitchell, said the new reference group would focus on all active travel modes.

“The rising popularity of scooters is just one example of an active travel mode used in many urban areas for both recreation and journeys to work.

“The new reference group will help Council form strategic partnerships with community and transport groups and help to advocate for more active travel opportunities or projects of benefit to the Redlands Coast.

“This includes pedestrian access and safety within our villages and centres and all ages mobility issues encompassing personal mobility devices.”

Division 10 Councillor and Deputy Chair of the new group, Cr Paul Bishop, said Council’s decision to establish the reference group scope was a clear call to action for those in the community with a passion for more active travel.

“More diverse active travel planning will help to shape the future character of our unique Redlands Coast and the way we move between and within our urban villages, as we celebrate our city’s naturally wonderfully environment,” Cr Bishop said.

“For this process to be a success we need genuine input from those most directly affected – our community.”

To express your interest in being a member of the Active Travel Group, please go to Council’s Yoursay Redland Coast website. The EOI closes on 30 April 2021.

Council to negotiate fair price for land


Redland City Council will try to negotiate a fair purchase price to potentially buy land in the Ormiston Koala Safe Neighbourhood Catchment area.

Deputy Mayor Julie Talty, who chaired the General Council Meeting this week while Mayor Karen Williams was in Canberra, said any future purchases in the area would adjoin existing Council-owned or managed areas and continue Council’s strategic approach to secure high-quality habitat and wildlife corridors.

“Council is committed to helping maintain and restore high-value ecological areas or priority koala habitat, including through revegetation,” Cr Talty said.

“We will continue to identify and seek to, where possible, protect land that offers opportunity to connect habitat for wildlife.”

Cr Talty said following this week’s decision, Council would start negotiations on a number of land packages in the Ormiston Koala Safe Neighbourhood Catchment area.

“It is important to note that the Local Government Act requires Council to achieve value for money in any purchases, which has resulted in Council not buying other land we have investigated previously,” Cr Talty said.

“While any privately owned land we are trying to buy is ultimately at the discretion of the owners of the land, we will commence negotiations on behalf of the community in hope of reaching an agreement with the owners.”

Division 1 Councillor Wendy Boglary said she hoped that Council would be able to purchase the identified parcels of land at a fair price to help protect future wildlife corridors and koala habitat.

“Ormiston and the surrounding suburbs has rich ecological value and we must work closely with the community to do all we can to protect it for future generations,” Cr Boglary said.

Cr Boglary has been advocating for a number of options regarding land in the koala catchment area.

This includes Council previously considering purchasing the entire Cowley Street, Ormiston, site.

Ultimately this did not proceed due to financial impact and because the habitat on the land was fragmented.

This week’s decision comes after trees were cleared on Cowley Street land by a private landowner based on an historic subdivision dating back over 100 years.

This historic status meant Council did not have a role to play in assessing the project nor the ability to prevent the removal of trees from the site, which is similarly the case for a number of neighbouring properties where residents have lived for many years.

Since 1993 Council has invested more than $35 million from our Environmental Levy to purchase more than 350 properties totalling 1,313 hectares.

Council moves to preserve local heritage places 


Redland City Council has asked the State Government for approval to add a number of local properties to its local heritage register.

Redland City Deputy Mayor Julie Talty said today’s decision followed public consultation on Council’s Heritage Major Amendment package that ran late last year.

“Today’s decision shows Council’s commitment to support our local heritage on Redlands Coast,” Cr Talty said.

“More than 300 places that contain European Heritage Values were examined by a heritage expert and in January 2019, Council made a resolution to commence the major amendment process to list priority sites to ensure that all local heritage themes identified in the City were represented.

“Today’s decision follows a 55-day public consultation period that resulted in 45 places proposed for inclusion in the Heritage Schedule.

“Almost 800 website visits and 37 submissions were received, including questions from property owners about the effect of adding their places on Schedule 7 (Heritage Schedule) of City Plan.

“Councillors have now adopted the public submission review report that was informed by submissions received during the consultation period as well as one-on-one meetings between interested property owners, Council officers and its heritage expert.

“Prior to commencement of the proposed amendment, Council will also consider an associated incentive packages to support affected property owners.”

Cr Talty said the amendment process had now reached a critical stage.

“Before any planning scheme amendment can be implemented, the Planning Minister must consider the proposal and provide approval to adopt it.

“Council will work with owners, the community and State Government in coming months in an effort to facilitate the preservation of our local heritage places.”

Implementation Plan adopted for Amity Point erosion management


Redland City Council has adopted an Implementation Plan to assist Council and property owners manage erosion along the Amity Point coastline on North Stradbroke Island.

Under Council’s Coastal Adaptation Strategy, Amity Point has been identified as a high-priority locality and has been the focus of Council-led Shoreline Erosion Management Planning (SEMP) since 2015, which sets out steps for property owners to protect their properties.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the southerly migration of the waterway between North Stradbroke and Moreton Island, has caused complex erosion impacts and resulted in decades of informal efforts to prevent property loss.

‘This Implementation Plan is a historic step in addressing these complex erosion issues.

“The plan outlines future works along the three distinct sections or ‘reaches’ of the coastline and agreement on property owner responsibilities, including Council.

“Importantly the plan includes recognition of the effective role the placement of rocks along the foreshore plays against erosion, particularly in the central reach.

“The recognition of this rock structure (known as a flow slide barrier) is a crucial element in the ability of property owners to plan for works to defend their properties.

“Council will assist landowners by applying for a high-level preliminary approval of the flow slide barrier so that landowners can proceed with carrying out the work required to protect their properties.”

Councillor for Division 2, Cr Peter Mitchell said the implementation plan supported landowners in ensuring they have the necessary development permits and approvals to carry out ongoing maintenance work on the section of flow slide barrier protecting their property.

“This implementation plan and the erosion management plan it supports have been developed in close consultation with the residents it is designed to support,” Cr Mitchell said.

“It outlines how residents can secure the permits they need to protect their properties, as well as explaining Council’s role in managing areas that protect local roads and parks.

“Future works will also include ongoing beach surveys and coastal process studies.

“The SEMP and Implementation Plan have also been developed in consultation with other stakeholders, including Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation, State Government agencies and the project’s Community Reference Group.”

For more information visit yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/amity-point-shoreline-erosion.

Fire review response has actioned and progressed all 56 recommendations. 


Council has completed all 56 recommendations included in the 2017 Fire Review by Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES).

Redland City Mayor and Local Disaster Management Group Chairperson, Cr Karen Williams said the QFES report was commissioned by Council following the 2016 fires on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands and resulted in significant improvements across the Redlands Coast.

“The community is to be congratulated for their very positive support towards these improvements.

“Commissioned by Council following 2016 fires on Macleay and Russell Island, the Fire Management Plan Review Report was a partnership with other emergency agencies and stakeholders who together worked to respond to the 42 recommendation made for SMBI fire responses and 14 for the mainland.

“Our Southern Moreton Bay Islands (SMBI) Island communities, in particular, are now much better prepared and supported including through the acclaimed SMBI Community Champions and new SMBI Coordinator role.

“Brokered in response to the review recommendations, the volunteer SMBI Community Champions have demonstrated the vital role that strong local networks have in supporting community resilience and emergency responses, especially for more remote communities like SMBI.

“Community education and awareness campaigns have been a fundamental part of the review response and included ‘Safer SMBI, “Spring Clean-Up’, ‘Know Your Neighbour’, ‘Street speaks’ and ‘Get ready campaigns’.

“The campaigns have helped to drive property clean-up and hazard reduction efforts and increased community resilience and readiness in an emergency.

“Tonnes of additional rubbish and abandoned car bodies have been removed from the SMBI properties in direct response to the campaigns. A property compliance effort has also resulted in 764 notices issued to reduce fire hazards and 83 properties cleaned up by Council and contractors.

“The ‘know you neighbour” campaign alongside new island coordinator and community champions has helped expand support for more vulnerable community members during emergencies.

Other fire review responses have included:

  • New local area emergency management plans developed across the city and provided to residents.
  • GIS mapping undertaken and sophisticated hazard and fuel load technology used to assess and map fire risks.
  • Evacuation routes surveyed and updated and emergency signage installed.
  • Fire trails inspected cleared and widened and a future program of work identified.
  • A new community emergency dashboard warning and alert system developed and in use.
  • Program of annual hazard reduction burns and vegetation management undertaken.
  • Vital new telecommunications infrastructure installed and upgraded.
  • New fire and emergency services equipment allocated and a new Brisbane Region Fire Mitigation Brigade established.

“Council, the community and multiple agencies have responded positively to improving our fire and emergency response. Working closely with the community and supporting individual responsibility for fire safety on private properties remains essential to ongoing improvement,” Cr Williams said.

“While today’s Council report formally closes the Fire Report recommendations, it does not stop the fire management activity that will continue alongside Council’s annual disaster preparedness activities.

“Recent storm events have reminded us to be ever vigilant in the face of fire, flood and storm events and to look at and address risks around our properties’.

‘Council will continue to support and advocate for well-co-ordinated fire and emergency responses across the Redlands, especially the regional hinterland areas around Mount Cotton and the Bay Islands including North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah).

Locations with large bushland areas, unique logistical and access issues, and demographically higher aged and vulnerable communities continue to require a whole of government and community response’.

 

Six-month Cleveland parking trial begins


A six-month trial of 26 one-hour parking spaces in Cleveland CBD has begun to help identify the benefits of providing more short-term parking spaces.

Division 2 Councillor Peter Mitchell said that balancing parking time limits was one way of ensuring town centres, such as Cleveland remain accessible to all users.

“We need to ensure our centres remain vibrant parts of the Redlands Coast community,” Cr Mitchell said.

“Currently, on-street parking in the Cleveland CBD is dominated by three-hour and longer parking options.

“This reflects past responses to parking, but the needs of the Cleveland town centre, visitors and businesses have changed over time.

“An over-emphasis on long-term parking can limit business turnover and frustrate those in the community who are unable to conduct their business because they cannot easily access available parking.

“To help strike a balance, Council has agreed to reduce the three-hour limits to one hour for 26 parking spaces in Middle Street and Bloomfield Street, Cleveland.”

The new one-hour parking spaces are in the following locations:
• 17 parking spaces on Bloomfield Street running from approximately outside Westpac Bank (on the corner of Bloomfield and Middle streets) to Stephen Dibb Jewellers
• 6 parking spaces on Middle Street, running from approximately Gisler’s Pie Café and Subway to Westpac Bank (on the corner of Bloomfield and Middle streets)
• 3 spaces on Bloomfield Street approximately outside Bloomfield Street News.

Cr Mitchell said the parking spaces chosen were those that regularly experienced high demand for parking with retail and pedestrian activity nearby.

“Some businesses cater to quick turnover customers, while others may need more extended parking times for their customers,” Cr Mitchell said.

“Having a mix of timed parking spaces is designed to cater for these differences.”

Cr Mitchell said parking was not the only solution.

“Good public transport access and walking and cycling-friendly spaces are also vital ingredients,” Cr Mitchell said.

“I expect the newly announced Redlands Coast Active Travel Reference group I will be chairing will also make an essential contribution to better urban transport, accessibility and active travel outcomes across the city.

“In the meantime, I hope that the trial of reduced on-street parking times limits may also help to improve parking access and turnover of available spaces.

“The data collected from the trial will be important for a future report to Council, and I encourage as many people as possible to contribute to the Yoursay Redlands Coast project page survey.”

Visit Council’s Your Say site at yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au

 

 

New Redlands Coast reference group to support active travel


Redland City Council has cemented its commitment to active transport by establishing a new reference group to advise on and advocate for all modes of active travel across the Redlands Coast.

The new advisory group of up to 15 members will focus on all modes of active travel, continuing Council’s recent investment in active transport infrastructure and innovation.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the new group would expand on the Redlands Bicycle Advisory Committee first formed in 2000.

“The Redlands Coast has a great cycling culture with hundreds of kilometres of on-road and off-road tracks and pathways.

“While recreational cycling continues to grow in popularity across the Redlands, it is equally important to focus on other forms of active travel for both recreation and everyday journeys.

“The rising popularity of scooters is an example of an active travel mode being used in many urban areas for both recreation and journeys to work.

“Having attractive, safe and accessible pathways and routes as alternatives to motor cars can contribute to both a healthier community and help to reduce road and parking congestion.”

The new reference group will be Chaired by Division 2 Councillor Peter Mitchell, with Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop to be Deputy Chair.

“The new reference group will help Council form strategic partnerships with community and transport groups and advocate for more active travel opportunities or projects of benefit to the Redlands Coast,” Cr Mitchell said.

“This group is as much about finding new active transport modes as it is perfecting those we already enjoy and as an advocate for modes like e-transport.

“I am excited by the potential for this group, including the opportunity to consider pedestrian access and safety within our villages and centres and all ages mobility issues encompassing personal mobility devices.”

Cr Bishop said the reference group continued the momentum created by the Redlands Coast Transport Strategy.

“Council’s decision to establish and widen the reference group scope is a clear call to action for those in the community with a passion for more active travel, especially in the post-COVID environment,” Cr Bishop said.

“Membership of the new group will be by both direct invitation and advertised expressions of interest. We hope to complete this process by the new year.

“In the meantime, I would encourage those with an interest to keep an eye out for the opportunity on Council’s Yoursay page or to contact council if they would like to learn more about the active travel group.

Have a say on future Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area land uses


Redland City Council is supporting the local jobs of tomorrow by prioritising economic development in the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area, with residents now invited to have their say.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council had focussed on jobs creation as part of a planning investigation for the area after Council had been directed by the State Government to consider the potential future growth area.

“This land has been the subject of almost 20 years of planning and community debate, disrupted by changing directions,” she said.

“The State Government previously included part of the area in the urban footprint, which would have seen the area used for residential development.

“But this decision was then reversed, with the State Government then nominating it as a Potential Future Growth Area and directing Council to undertake planning investigations to determine the preferred future use of the area.

“Council has been firm that this area should be used for jobs, not small lot housing and so we have developed a plan to reflect this commitment.

“The proposals include areas for mixed industry and business, intensive horticulture, education, training and recreation, a transport precinct, storage and larger home-based industry enterprise activities,” she said.

Cr Williams said Council had also drawn a line in the sand by clearly stating that land not used for economic uses should only be used for larger rural living blocks (i.e., with a minimum lot size of 1 hectare) and not small lot housing.

“Given this area has seen a number of uses suggested over the years, Council wanted to make it clear that we do not support small lot housing and will only support rural living, which fits with the character of the area while also addressing homebuyer demand for this sort of rural product.”

Cr Williams said Council had also resolved to consult the whole community on the proposed use of the area at the same time the proposed plan was sent to the Minister.

“The Minister wrote to Council asking us to engage with landowners in the plan area, but Council believes this land is strategically important for the entire city and given we are focussing on job creation in the area we felt everyone should have the opportunity to have a say,” Cr Williams said.

“As such we have today opened engagement and are inviting the community to provide feedback. The views of the community will be used to inform a potential future amendment to City Plan.

“There has been a lot of debate and history to these land use recommendations, and Council wants to hear the community’s feedback on the proposed balance of future economic and residential use of the land.”

For more information about the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area, and to have your say on the draft proposals for preferred future land uses, visit the project’s page on Council’s Your Say site.

Council urges pre-schoolies visitors to behave responsibly and stay COVID-safe


Redland City Council is urging young people who may be planning to visit North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah) for ‘pre-schoolies’ to stay vigilant and follow Queensland Health COVID-19 restrictions.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council wrote to the chair of the District Disaster Coordination Centre last month to advise of the upcoming event and seek advice regarding the expected influx of school leavers that visit the island during the September school holidays.

“While there are usually no planned events for pre-schoolies, there are generally large gatherings on the island’s beaches and in the townships, so we wrote to Queensland Health to make them aware of the event,” she said.

“The response acknowledged that while there may be increased travellers to the island, there are no formal planned events, so school leavers would need to comply with the relevant Queensland Health restrictions in place at the time.

“We welcome these young adults to Redlands Coast, but with large groups comes heightened risk of virus transmission so it is also vital that they help us prevent local outbreaks by adhering to COVID-19 restrictions.

“This includes keeping to the physical distancing rule of staying at least 1.5m away from others, the gathering rules of no more than 10 people in public and private places – excluding venues with a COVID-safe plan in place – and regularly washing and sanitising hands.”

Division 2 Councillor for North Stradbroke Island Peter Mitchell said young visitors to the island should also follow any directions given by Queensland Police.

“There are vulnerable communities living on Minjerribah, and the last thing we would want to see is an outbreak of COVID-19 there,” Cr Mitchell said.

“The rules are in place for a good reason and fines for breaches are significant.

“While Minjerribah is a beautiful location to celebrate the transition from school to adulthood, I urge all visitors to the island to help keep themselves and others safe by acting responsibly, knowing the rules, and keeping to them.”

For information about COVID-19 restrictions in Queensland, visit qld.gov.au/health/conditions/health-alerts/coronavirus-covid-19