Author Archives: News Admin

Beaches closed, ferry services unchanged as marine tsunami warning continues


Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) has closed its exposed patrolled beaches, including those on North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah) on Redlands Coast, while the current marine tsunami warning remains in place.

Wellington Point Reserve beach, which is also patrolled by SLSQ, will remain open as usual due to its more protected nature.

Passenger and vehicular ferry services continue as usual to North Stradbroke Island, the Southern Moreton Bay Islands and Coochiemudlo Island.

Conditions continue to be closely monitored by emergency services agencies.

The marine tsunami warning in Queensland is from the Fraser Coast to the Queensland/New South Wales border.

It is a warning for dangerous rips, waves, strong ocean current and some localised overflow onto the immediate foreshore.

Please continue to monitor the BoM alerts

Queensland marine tsunami warning including waters of Moreton Bay


There is a current marine tsunami warning from Sandy Cape to Point Danger, including the waters of Moreton Bay, Fraser Island, Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast.

The Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre has issued the warning and advised:

  • Possibility of dangerous rips, waves, strong ocean currents and some overflow onto immediate foreshore.
  • Evacuation not necessary
  • People to get out the water and move away from immediate waters’ edge

Please monitor the BOM website for updates.

Council services reopening after COVID lockdown lifts and EKKA holiday arrives


Following the State Government’s announcement this morning that the South-East Queensland lockdown will end at 4pm today, most of Redland City Council services will resume on Tuesday 10 August after the Redlands Coast EKKA public holiday tomorrow on Monday 9 August. Limited services will be in operation tomorrow on the public holiday.

In line with the lockdown lifting, our playground and outdoor exercise equipment, skate parks, BMX tracks and public barbecues are no longer off limits to the community. Please be mindful of current State Government gathering limits of up to 10 people gathering in a public space.

Redland Performing Arts Centre will reopen on Tuesday however, for ticketed and seated shows only 50 per cent of the audience will be allowed, in line with restrictions. This may affect some performances and activities over the next two weeks.

Council services will reopen in line with the current State Government restrictions that remain in place for the next two weeks.

However, Council encourages residents to make full use of Council’s online and telephone services where they can.

Face masks and checking in are required.

Council services reopening on EKKA public holiday, Monday 9 August

Redland Animal Shelter will open from 9am to 12pm, and will return to normal operating days and times from Tuesday. Follow Redland Animal Shelter on Facebook.

Community halls and the tennis courts at Wellington Point will reopen to those with pre-existing bookings on Monday, with new bookings being accepted from Tuesday. In line with current gathering restrictions, there will be limits to the number of people allowed in our community halls at one time.

Cleveland Aquatic Centre will reopen from Monday. Visit the Cleveland Aquatic Centre website for opening hours.

Bin collection services and all Recycling and Waste Centre operations, which have continued throughout the lockdown will run as usual.

Council services reopening on Tuesday 10 August
Council services resuming regular operating hours on Tuesday include:
• All Council customer service centres
• Redland Performing Arts Centre (RPAC) box office. RPAC will operate with 50 per cent capacity with seated, ticket allocations. Follow RPAC on Facebook.
• Cleveland and Capalaba Art Galleries (RAG). Follow RAG on Facebook.
• All Council libraries. Follow Redland City Libraries on Facebook.
• IndigiScapes. Follow IndigiScapes on Facebook.
• Visitor Information Centre at Raby Bay Harbour Park.

Out of hours emergencies
For council-related emergencies, please phone 3829 8999.

Point Lookout Gorge Walk update – still great viewing


You can still keep a lookout for whales from the Point Lookout Gorge Walk during whale watching season until November.

Council is working on plans to reconstruct a damaged section roughly in the middle of the Point Lookout Gorge Walk at North Stradbroke Island.

Council closed a section of the Gorge Walk in late March after significant rainfall damaged a section of the foundations on the southern side of the centre bridge.

However most of the walk, one of the southern hemisphere’s best land-based whale watching vantage points, can still be completed.

Analysis has confirmed that a 25 metre section of the boardwalk will require extensive reconstruction, including the installation of new foundations into the underlying rock.

This is a difficult area in which to undertake works and, at the same time, protect its beautiful surrounds.

Heavy earth moving equipment cannot be used and it is believed works will have to be undertaken by hand.

Council is seeking contractors to undertake the work and will be able to provide further information, including a timeline and costs, once a contractor has been engaged.

Until the works are completed the Gorge Walk will remain partially closed.

However the majority of the Gorge Walk remains open to tourists and locals, with entry points at both the southern and northern ends. The damaged section is located roughly in the middle of the walk.

The Gorge Walk offers multiple vantage points to experience the stunning scenery and abundant wildlife on North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah), but Council urges everyone to take heed of the site safety signage and not enter the closed area.

Residents and visitors are advised to stay on the designated trail and not attempt to bypass or cut through the closed section, as it sits over a steep section of the headland.

A fall could result in serious injury and sensitive vegetation is also present in the area.

Until the boardwalk fully reopens, read the signs and be safe, and enjoy our wonderful Redlands Coast.

Redlands Coast budget delivers for community


Redland City Council has adopted a $327 million budget for 2021-22 that focusses on caring for and improving vital community assets while keeping rates rises to a minimum.

The budget, which matches last year’s record spend, includes a $70 million-plus capital investment in the city that features key inter-generational projects to help Redlands Coast’s continued recovery from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mayor Karen Williams said the budget was a responsible and back-to-basics approach to meeting residents’ immediate needs while also ensuring their future aspirations could be realised.

“This budget will support our continued recovery from the challenges of COVID-19 by underpinning local employment through significant investment in the type of projects and infrastructure that will help to grow our economy, support jobs and further improve the lifestyle that residents enjoy,” Cr Williams said.

“Councillors have been mindful of the need for a firm focus on asset management and taking care of what we already have, while acknowledging the opportunities that can come from significant inter-generational projects such as the Birkdale Community Precinct and Redlands Coast Sports and Recreation Precinct.

“We are doing this while maintaining a strong balance sheet despite the multi-million-dollar hit from COVID and increased State Government bulk water charges, ensuring the increase in general rates is kept to an average 1.7 per cent – or about 44 cents a week for a typical category 1a, owner-occupied property, excluding separate charges, utilities and State Government charges.

“We will continue to spend locally wherever appropriate to help stimulate the economy and provide local jobs.”

Cr Williams said the projected $70 million capital budget was heavily targeted at maintaining and improving lifestyle assets.

“Developing our open spaces and sports fields, along with improving facilities in our parks, is front and foremost,” she said.

“This includes advancing projects such as the Birkdale Community Precinct and the Sport and Recreation Precinct.

“Both are defining catalyst projects for this city that we have committed to in our Corporate Plan and which will bring benefits well into the future.

“We will look to take advantage of the Reserve Bank of Australia’s expectation that record low interest rates will continue and, where appropriate, borrow for economy-boosting projects such as these, while maintaining our cash balances above borrowing levels.

“In the meantime, $3.5 million has been allocated to progress the Redlands Coast Sport and Recreation Precinct project at Heinemann Road, Mount Cotton and more than $1 million to fund the next stage of the exciting Birkdale Community Precinct.

“There is also $3 million for the continued redevelopment of Redland Bay’s Weinam Creek transport hub, which will become a real focal point for southern Redlands Coast.

“Our program of enhancing our outdoors assets continues, with another $7 million for local parks and streetscapes, taking the spend in the past two years to around $20 million.”

Cr Williams said $25 million would be directed to road and transport networks.

“This includes $10.8 million to continue the vital Wellington Street upgrade and another $2 million for green sealing Southern Moreton Bay Island roads,” she said.

Council has also restructured the way it funds environmental management with a new Environment and Coastal Management Separate Charge replacing the Environment Separate Charge to help cover the cost of caring for the city’s 335km of coastline and other waterfront.

“This recognises the broader responsibilities that we have as a coastal city,” Cr Williams said.

“For less than $3 a week, the charge will help ensure we keep Redlands Coast naturally wonderful by supporting initiatives such as shoreline erosion management and our Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy, as well as continuing our vital environmental programs.”

Cr Williams said increases in water, waste, utility and other charges reflected the increased costs faced by Council in providing the essential services, including major sewerage and waste water treatment works.

“We need to spend $13 million this financial year on essential water, waste and wastewater projects alone to ensure we maintain our high standard of service delivery,” Cr Williams said.

“The bottom line hasn’t been helped by yet another increase in the State Government’s bulk water price, which has gone up another 3.5 per cent after years of big rises to have more than doubled since 2012, and increases in areas such as the cost or recycling.

“At the same time councils have a legislative requirement that pricing for these essential services is established by considering the full cost of a commercial business.

“However, we have still been able to provide total pensioner rates and utilities rebates of almost $3.5 million, with rates rebates at $335 a year for a full pensioner and $167.50 for a part-pensioner.

“In the meantime, Council will be stepping up its efforts to attract further funding from the State and Federal governments to take pressure off ratepayers.”

The 2021-22 budget at a glance:

  • $327 million investment in Redlands Coast, matching last year’s investment
  • An increase in general rates revenue of 1.7 per cent, or about 44 cents a week, for a typical category 1a, owner-occupied property, excluding separate charges, utilities and State Government charges
  • Small budgeted operating surplus
  • Capital expenditure of more than $70 million
  • Total pensioner rebates of almost $3.5 million, with rates rebates of $335 a year for a full pensioner or $167.50 for a part-pensioner.
  • A new annual Environment and Coastal Management Separate Charge of $148.92 (replacing the previous Environment Management Separate Charge) to also cover coastal management.

Capital expenditure program at a glance:

  • $25 million for transport, roads and traffic projects
  • $13 million for water, waste and wastewater projects
  • $8 million for other capital works projects, including $2 million for land acquisitions
  • $8 million for marine and foreshore projects, including canal and breakwater works
  • $8 million for infrastructure projects such as transport, buildings and stormwater
  • $7 million for parks, open space and conservation
  • $ 1 million for community and cultural development

Visit our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for more budget information.

Investing in Redlands Coast’s naturally wonderful lifestyle


Enhancing Redlands Coast’s recreational and sporting opportunities will be a key focus for Redland City Council through 2021-22.

Today’s budget provides for significant investment in major inter-generational projects, such as the much anticipated Birkdale Community Precinct and Redlands Coast Sport and Recreational Precinct, while also ensuring popular existing community spaces are well cared for.

Mayor Karen Williams said the budget supported Council’s long-term vision to make Redlands Coast an exceptional place to live and play, building on a multi-million-dollar program of park, playground and sports facility upgrades across the city in recent years.

“The budget includes more than $1 million for progressing the very exciting Birkdale Community Precinct, including the historic Willard’s Farm restoration, as well as $3.5 million for the Redlands Coast Regional Sport and Recreation Precinct on Heinemann Road – both projects which will have immense benefits for residents well into the future,” Cr Williams said.

“We have also put aside $2 million to allow us to move swiftly should more strategic land for the community become available, continuing our strategy of bringing important sites back into community ownership.

“In recent years we have invested about $29 million to bring more than 360ha into community ownership for conservation and community use.

“Our focus also remains very much on caring for what we already have, with more than $7 million earmarked for renewing and improving popular community parks and sports fields alone.

“This takes the total spend in the past two years past $20 million.

“There’s $1.1 million for the major renewal of one of Redlands Coast’s best loved bayside spaces, Thorneside’s Beth Boyd Park, later in the financial year, plus significant allocations for Cleveland’s William Ross Park, Redland Bay’s Penrose Avenue Park and Victoria Point’s Parklands Court Park.

“These are just some of the parks across the city to benefit.

“We will also spend more than $40 million running and maintaining the 300-plus parks and civic open spaces that we have, including caring for more than 30,000 assets areas ranging from play equipment and exercise equipment to park furniture, as well as managing about 10,000ha of conservation areas.

“Mowing alone is a massive undertaking, with multiple mows of our parks, sports fields, roads and public utility land totalling 19,000ha – an area the size of Moreton Island – keeping our crews very busy.

“That alone is projected to cost more than $3.4 million this financial year.”

Major investments in open space

  • Redlands Coast Sport and Recreation Precinct, Heinemann Road, $3.5 million
  • Land acquisition $2 million
  • Beth Boyd Park, Thorneside, $1.1 million
  • Birkdale Community Precinct $1 million
  • William Ross Park, Cleveland, $606,000

Visit our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for more budget information.

Funding boost for Redlands Coast environment


Redland City Council’s broader-ranging Environment and Coastal Management Separate Charge will fund a $1.7 million investment in the city’s beaches, foreshores and waterways in 2021-2022 as part of a suite of major environmental and conservation programs and initiatives.

The new Environment and Coastal Management Separate Charge, adopted today as part of Redland City Council’s annual budget, recognises Council’s increasing responsibilities as a coastal city.

Mayor Karen Williams said the charge, which replaced the Environment Separate Charge, would significantly extend Council’s ability to care for the local environment.

“The change reflects how much our community values our naturally wonderful areas and lifestyle, especially our beaches, foreshores and waterways,” Cr Williams said.

“For less than $3 a week, it will help support Redlands Coast’s stunning coastal assets, including initiatives such as shoreline erosion management and our Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy, as well as continuing our vital environmental programs. The key change is that it will now help cover the cost of caring for our 335 km of coastline and other waterways, which would otherwise have to be paid for through rates.

“This is projected to cost $1.7 million this year as part of an environmental and conservation effort to cost almost $11 million. It ensures we put away the funds needed to protect, manage and enhance our island and mainland coasts and waterways, including koala habitat, while we continue to support our broader conservation and environmental work.”

The charge will also fund operational and capital projects, including:

  • Bushland and fire management
  • Foreshore and catchment rehabilitation and maintenance
  • Track and trail maintenance and repairs
  • Environmental education
  • Koala habitat restoration
  • Managing impacts of climate change
  • Delivering the Redlands Coast Biosecurity Plan and Redlands Coast Bay and Creeks Plan
  • Prioritising works under the Coastal Hazard Adaption Strategy and Shoreline Erosion Management Plan

“This new approach helps us to do what the community wants us to do while getting the best value for money we can,” Cr Williams said.

Visit our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for more budget information.

Redlands Coast island infrastructure boost


Redlands Coast’s Southern Moreton Bay Island (SMBI) communities will benefit from more than $4 million in major transport infrastructure spending in the 2021-22 Redland City Council budget.

Mayor Karen Williams said the allocations were headlined by further significant investment in the SMBI ferry terminal project, with $2.8 million allocated to the Macleay Island ferry terminal.

“Another almost $1.4 million will go towards works at the Macleay, Russell, Lamb and Karragarra island commuter interchanges as part of our program to make it easier for residents and visitors to commute and travel to and from the islands,” Cr Williams said.

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said $2 million had also been allocated to green sealing island roads, which would bring the total spend on green sealing island roads to more than $17 million since 2014.

“Priority will be given to areas that currently have high maintenance costs,” Cr Edwards said.

“On Macleay Island, 24km of sealing has been completed with the remaining 11km of unsealed roads expected to be sealed in the next few years, depending on budget.

“There is still 45km to be done on Russell Island, which has a larger network of roads than the rest of the Southern Moreton Bay Islands combined, with 25km completed so far.

“Green sealing work is close to being completed on both Lamb and Karragarra islands, with almost 60km done across the four islands.

“Along with the massive ferry terminal project, we see these road improvements as vital to the islands’ futures.”

Other major island spends include $718,000 for Russell Island’s Rocky Point seawall, $198,000 for drainage works at Lamb Island’s tennis courts and $29,000 for the Bay Islands Memorial Garden on Russell Island.

Fire mitigation on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands will account for another $590,000, with $197,000 set aside for work on North Stradbroke Island, including prescribed burns, construction of fire access trails and fuel reduction works.

More than $375,000 has also been allocated from the new Environment and Coastal Management Separate Charge for shoreline erosion management at Amity Point, on North Stradbroke Island, including beach nourishment and further research into issues identified in the Amity Point Shoreline Erosion Management Plan.

Council will also conduct a foreshore survey on Coochiemudlo Island to monitor changes over time as recommended by the island’s Shoreline Erosion Management Plan.

Visit our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for more budget information.

Redland City Council to start smoke testing


Redland City Council will begin its sanitary drain smoke-testing program in the Alexandra Hills area in June.

The non-toxic smoke, which doesn’t smell like fire, will be blown into sewer maintenance holes to check the city’s wastewater network for defects, damage or illegal connections.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council’s contractor Veolia would need access to some properties during this time but there would be no interruption to services.

“All authorised officers will carry identification cards that will be produced on request,” Cr Williams said.

Affected residents will be advised in advance and there will be no need to be at your home during the inspection, however please contact Council if there are any access issues, such as dogs or security gates. If your property has a maintenance hole, please ensure there is clear access.

Cr Williams said emergency services were aware of the smoke testing, which was part of Council’s ongoing commitment to improving community infrastructure.

“The smoke flows through the sewer and will escape through sewer maintenance holes and sewer vents, which are often on the roof of your property, so if it does smell like smoke and you are concerned, please don’t ignore it as the smoke used in the program is similar to that used in special effects and doesn’t smell like smoke from a fire,” Cr Williams said.

Smoke testing is used to find where stormwater is entering the sewerage system and causing wet weather overflows. It can also identify any illegal or incorrect stormwater connections, as well as cracks or breaks in pipes which can result in stormwater entering sewer pipes, leading to potential flooding and sewage overflows.

Affected areas

Zone 1

  • Montgomery Drive from No 39 to McMillan Road
  • Lincoln Close
  • Holborn Court
  • Doncaster Place
  • Elina Court
  • Justin Court
  • Normanby Street
  • Dean road
  • Dawson Road
  • Ludmilla place
  • Greenlea Place
  • Flowers Street
  • Eton Court
  • Trent circuit
  • Caleedonia Crescent
  • Cromwell Court
  • Kingsbury Court
  • Stonebridge Street
  • Middleton Court
  • Pembroke Court

Zone 2

  • Mcdonald Road no 143 to McMillan Road
  • Sylvania Street
  • Leah court
  • Jasper Street
  • Cherry Street
  • Amethyst Street
  • Sapphire Drive
  • Jade Court
  • Gem Close
  • Emerald Street
  • Agate Court
  • Amber Place
  • Andamooka Place
  • Opal Court
  • Ruby Street
  • Diamond Street
  • Garnet Street
  • Topaz Streetr
  • Allenby Road No 105 to McMillan Road
  • McMillan Road – Allenby Road to Mcdonald Road including 8-56

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zone 3

  • Finucane Road – Allenby Road to Mcdonald Road
  • Sallows Street
  • Birch Street
  • Muir Court
  • Somerset Street
  • Westminster Avenue
  • Hefferman Road
  • Hunter Street
  • Hielscher Street
  • Cook Street
  • Lawrence cout
  • Johnson Street
  • Sussex Street
  • O’Gorman Street
  • Winchester Street
  • Cochrane Street No 3 to 27 and No 2 to 20
  • Osmond Street
  • Bedford Court
    Maclean Court
  • Suthurst Court
  • Payne Court
  • Belgravia Street
  • Andrew Court
  • Winchester Road up to 29 and 44

Karragarra compost trial launch sows seeds for food waste recycling revolution


Karragarra Island Organics Composting Trial officially opens on April 30, heralding an important trailblazer for more community-based organics recycling schemes.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the collaboration between Council, the University of Queensland’s Centre for Recycling of Organic Waste and Nutrients (CROWN) and three island-based community groups was an important step closer to having a zero organic waste community.

“Karragarra Island produces about 16,000kg of organic food waste a year that goes to landfill,” Cr Williams said.

“It would be fantastic if that amount could be reduced by half.

“With 26 households already signed up, and capacity for a total of about 50 to join the trial, we are well on our way to testing if the community can do that.”

CROWN director Johannes Biala said the Karragarra Island project would be a model and source of information and inspiration for others to follow.

“It has placed Redlands Coast islands ahead of many mainland communities,” Mr Biala said.

“There is no doubt it will continue to thrive well beyond the trial end date in July 2021.”

CROWN has been a key driver in the composting scheme, helping to organise funding through a Goodman Foundation Moreton Bay (Quandamooka) Research Grant, engaging the community and designing the novel, forced-aeration composting system.

“The idea for the solar-powered composting system came from a California-based website,” Mr Biala said.

“Two solar panels are generating power that is stored in lithium batteries.

“This power is then converted to 240V and used to drive a blower, which operates on a time switch.

“Air is supplied via sub-surface pipes to the base of the new compost bays, which is then drawn up into the composted material due to the heat generated by the composting process.”

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards urged more island households to sign up to the trial.

“If more organic food waste can be retained for beneficial use within the island communities, it will not only be a great saving to Council but a clever way for islanders to become more self-sufficient as food growers,” Cr Edwards said.

“Taking part in the trial is a simple process, with supplied kitchen caddies and compostable liners available at Karragarra Community Garden.

“People can empty their caddies into 240-litre bins that have been placed at the community garden and near the island jetty.”

From left, Rose Childe of Running Wild Youth Conservation Culture, CROWN director Johannes Biala and Shirley Lindsay of Karragarra Community Garden.

Rose Childe, of Running Wild Youth Conservation Culture, said conservation and land management trainees would help process the compost.

“It’s an exciting opportunity for them to use the innovative technology and we’re pleased to be involved in something that engages with the community and ties in with the environmental focus of our organisation,” Ms Childe said.

Shirley Lindsay, of Karragarra Community Garden, said she was hopeful the trial would convert people to separating and composting food waste.

“I think people will want to be part of a great success story,” she said.

“The community garden would use all the compost generated for vegetable crops and fruit trees.

“As a good gardener, you can never have enough compost and mulch.

Jettie Berkhout, of SMBI Permaculture, said the trial aligned with permaculture principles.

“Permaculture is a way of living ethically, caring for the earth and taking care of people and future generations,” Ms Berkhout said.

“SMBI Permaculture believes this is a wonderful beginning in creating a resilient community on Karragarra Island. We hope this program is successful and it will extend soon to the other islands.”