Category Archives: conservation

Native orchids strike a pose right across Redlands Coast


Redlands Coast has been putting on an unexpected display of late, with recent rain resulting in bumper flowering of native orchids.

Mayor Karen Williams said Redlands Coast was home to a number of Australia’s 1200 species of native orchids, many of which were not found in any other countries.

“The largest local mass flowerings in 10 years have recently been observed by Redland City Council officers who support and regularly visit local properties participating in the Land For Wildlife program,” Cr Williams said.

Slender hyacinth orchid, Dipodium variegatum

“Often orchid plants can be difficult to find and get overlooked, so such a spectacular and broad flowering event provides a great chance to rediscover orchids that have been dormant.

“We’re encouraging all Redlands Coast residents and visitors to keep an eye out for these beauties while bushwalking or otherwise enjoying our conservation areas.

“If you suspect you’ve found one, please take a photo and send it to our team, who can help you identify it.”

Division 6 Councillor Julie Talty said she was delighted to learn of the abundance of flowering orchids found on a Land for Wildlife property in Redland Bay with the help of young nature-lover Emily Wilkinson.

Emily Wilkinson with a flowering dipodium variegatum orchid found on her family’s Redland Bay property

“I hear Emily was keen to show our Environmental Partnerships team member around her property while undertaking her own nature treasure hunt,” Cr Talty said.

Councillor Williams said that, as a free voluntary program, Land For Wildlife encouraged and assisted private landholders such as Emily’s family to enhance habitats for native plants and animals on their properties.

“While supported locally by Council, the regionally coordinated program has just registered its 5000th participant in south east Queensland.”

“Your property can still be primarily managed for other purposes while reaping the benefits of the Land For Wildlife Program.”

To find out whether Land For Wildlife or one of our other Environmental Partnership Programs could benefit you and your property, visit indigiscapes.com.au or email environmentalpartnerships@redland.qld.gov.au.

Five finger orchid, Calandenia catenata

Send your native orchid photograph into Council for ID

Email environmentalpartnerships@redland.qld.gov.au with your photograph and details of where it was found but please don’t pick or dig it up.

Native orchids are protected by law and if you take them out of their natural environment they are unlikely to survive.

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Birkdale conservation area to be named Jack Rosa Urban Habitat


Redland City Council is to name a Birkdale conservation area in memory of local identity Jack Rosa.

Mayor Karen Williams said the parkland at 44-56 Randall Road, Birkdale, would be named the Jack Rosa Urban Habitat after the late farmer from Italy who had a long history of giving back to the community that he maintained had given so much to him.

“Ciriaco Rosa, known as Jack Rosa, left behind many significant contributions to Redlands Coast that are greatly acknowledged and appreciated,” Cr Williams said.

“Born in Taurasi in southern Italy, Mr Rosa was the eldest of eight children. During his years in Italy he became a policeman and fought in World War II, earning the Italian War Merit Cross on the Adriatic frontline.

“He immigrated to Australia in 1952, and was married by proxy two years later with his brother Pippino standing in for him back in Italy. His wife Virginia, known as Gina, soon moved to Australia so they could be together. They had grown up in neighbouring villages in Italy.

“The Rosas ran a seven-hectare farm on Bailey Road, Birkdale, where they grew and sold various mixed crops, including grapes, tomatoes and cucumbers. Mr Rosa maintained that he would give back to his new country that had given him so much, and duly dedicated himself to charity work.”

Mayor Karen Williams, Pia Rosa (holding a photo of her late father Jack Rosa), Cr Tracey Huges and Dino Rosa.

Mr Rosa was heavily involved with the Capalaba Lions Club, serving as President at one stage. He also joined Meals on Wheels and was the instigator for building one large kitchen in Capalaba to improve conditions.

“He was a strong advocate and was one of the first to highlight the need for an ambulance, police and fire service in Capalaba; and advocated for the building of a Girl Guide hut in the area; as well as the Capalaba Bowls Club,” Cr Williams said.

“He was also involved in the Redlands District Committee of the Ageing (RDCOTA), serving as Treasurer for 14 years; the Handicapped Association; the Community Assistance for Italians (Coasit); the St Anthony’s Catholic Parish at Alexandra Hills; and he was one of the first members of the Redland Sporting Club.”

The 16,644-square-metre conservation area that will be named Jack Rosa Urban Habitat was established as part of Redland Investment Corporation’s reconfiguration of 521 Old Cleveland Road East, Birkdale, for a multiple-dwelling development.

Division 8 Councillor Tracey Huges, who met with members of the local community and Mr Rosa’s family, said she quickly identified that he was a prominent resident who offered years of significant contribution to Redlands Coast.

“The naming of the area after him would be an appropriate way to honour his legacy,” Cr Huges said.

“Mr Rosa and his wife remained living on an urban block on Randall Road after selling their farm in 1972.

“His wonderful and tireless work for the community was recognised many times by Redland City Council. He was also the recipient of a Centenary Medal from the prime minister in 1988, while in August 2018, he received his 50-year medallion for his services to Capalaba Lions Club.”

Mr Rosa’s beloved wife Gina died in April 2018 at the age of 85. He died eight months later, on December 24, 2018. He was 94.

Council has resolved to install signage at the Randall Road site to reflect the approved name of Jack Rosa Urban Habitat.

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Karragarra compost trial launch sows seeds for food waste recycling revolution


Karragarra Island Organics Composting Trial officially opens on April 30, heralding an important trailblazer for more community-based organics recycling schemes.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the collaboration between Council, the University of Queensland’s Centre for Recycling of Organic Waste and Nutrients (CROWN) and three island-based community groups was an important step closer to having a zero organic waste community.

“Karragarra Island produces about 16,000kg of organic food waste a year that goes to landfill,” Cr Williams said.

“It would be fantastic if that amount could be reduced by half.

“With 26 households already signed up, and capacity for a total of about 50 to join the trial, we are well on our way to testing if the community can do that.”

CROWN director Johannes Biala said the Karragarra Island project would be a model and source of information and inspiration for others to follow.

“It has placed Redlands Coast islands ahead of many mainland communities,” Mr Biala said.

“There is no doubt it will continue to thrive well beyond the trial end date in July 2021.”

CROWN has been a key driver in the composting scheme, helping to organise funding through a Goodman Foundation Moreton Bay (Quandamooka) Research Grant, engaging the community and designing the novel, forced-aeration composting system.

“The idea for the solar-powered composting system came from a California-based website,” Mr Biala said.

“Two solar panels are generating power that is stored in lithium batteries.

“This power is then converted to 240V and used to drive a blower, which operates on a time switch.

“Air is supplied via sub-surface pipes to the base of the new compost bays, which is then drawn up into the composted material due to the heat generated by the composting process.”

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards urged more island households to sign up to the trial.

“If more organic food waste can be retained for beneficial use within the island communities, it will not only be a great saving to Council but a clever way for islanders to become more self-sufficient as food growers,” Cr Edwards said.

“Taking part in the trial is a simple process, with supplied kitchen caddies and compostable liners available at Karragarra Community Garden.

“People can empty their caddies into 240-litre bins that have been placed at the community garden and near the island jetty.”

From left, Rose Childe of Running Wild Youth Conservation Culture, CROWN director Johannes Biala and Shirley Lindsay of Karragarra Community Garden.

Rose Childe, of Running Wild Youth Conservation Culture, said conservation and land management trainees would help process the compost.

“It’s an exciting opportunity for them to use the innovative technology and we’re pleased to be involved in something that engages with the community and ties in with the environmental focus of our organisation,” Ms Childe said.

Shirley Lindsay, of Karragarra Community Garden, said she was hopeful the trial would convert people to separating and composting food waste.

“I think people will want to be part of a great success story,” she said.

“The community garden would use all the compost generated for vegetable crops and fruit trees.

“As a good gardener, you can never have enough compost and mulch.

Jettie Berkhout, of SMBI Permaculture, said the trial aligned with permaculture principles.

“Permaculture is a way of living ethically, caring for the earth and taking care of people and future generations,” Ms Berkhout said.

“SMBI Permaculture believes this is a wonderful beginning in creating a resilient community on Karragarra Island. We hope this program is successful and it will extend soon to the other islands.”

 

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Order a green waste bin during May and be in the running to win one of 100 worm farms


Redlands Coast mainland householders have an opportunity to win a worm farm if they sign up for a green waste bin during the month of May.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the promotion was part of Council’s campaign to secure 500 green waste bin orders over the month, starting on 2 May to coincide with International Compost Awareness Week.

“Council wants to boost the uptake of green waste bins because of the benefits they represent for the environment, and because they are convenient and good value for garden lovers,” Cr Williams said.

“Green waste bins currently do not have an establishment fee and homeowners who order before 31 May 2021 will have the chance to go in the draw for one of the 100 worm farms that Council is giving away, valued at $89.95 each.”

An example of the $89.95 worm farms on offer for residents to win.

Cr Williams said at present the ongoing cost associated with a green waste bin equated to just $1.23 a week, or $16 a quarter.

“For keen gardeners who produce a lot of green waste, the fortnightly collection service for bins is an easy and convenient option when compared to loading up the trailer to take it to a recycling and waste centre,” she said.

“People also have the satisfaction of knowing they’ve helped weed out unnecessary waste going to landfill because green bin contents are turned into new enriching organic products, such as soils, soil enhancers and mulch.

“And winners will also get to test out how well worm farms work for composting food scraps in their own homes, which helps to further reduce overall waste sent to landfill.

“The May promotion is part of the broader Council target for 21,000 green waste bins to be in use by the end of 2021 and 35,000 by 2025.”

Green waste bins can be ordered online from Council’s website or by calling 3829 8999.

Acceptable green bin items are:

  • Garden prunings
  • Grass clippings (do not bag if using a green waste bin)
  • Shrubs
  • Weeds and flowers
  • Leaves and loose bark
  • Sawdust
  • Small branches or soft wood (no larger than 75cm in length or 10cm in diameter)

Further details

  • The promotion is only available to mainland residents and new customers.
  • Customers ordering a second bin will be eligible.
  • Annual fees apply and are subject to change.
  • Council recommends tenants interested in green bins contact Council and register their interest so that when green waste bins are available to tenants we can contact them directly. Alternatively, tenants can contact their landlords to request they order a bin on their behalf.
  • Island residents can register their interest by contacting Council.
  • Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling plan is out for consultation and residents can hear more about the focus on reducing waste and increasing recycling from the kerbside bins and have their say until 28 May.
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Connect and restore at IndigiScapes Eco Markets


Celebrate with Redlands IndigiScapes Centre the natural wonders of Redlands Coast at the environmental centre’s series of Eco Markets, kicking off tomorrow (Saturday 1 May, 2021).

Mayor Karen Williams said the May event – the first of four scheduled for this year – would be held in the centre’s beautiful native botanic gardens and include market stalls featuring sustainable products, upcycled fashion, fresh produce and more.

“There will also be live music, local arts and crafts, books and displays, including permaculture and native beekeeping,” she said.

“The IndigiScapes nursery, cafe and gardens will all be open for the community to come along and connect and restore in nature.

“Redlands Coast, from islands to coastal areas and hinterland, boasts a wonderfully diverse natural environment, with 40 per cent protected green space, and so much to see and do.

“Council’s IndigiScapes is one of those great places where people can immerse in nature and discover more about their own naturally wonderful home.

“You will be able to visit the markets, buy native plants from the nursery, enjoy the walking tracks and native botanic gardens, visit the Discovery Centre and gift shop, and choose from a range of delicious food.

“If you like, you can also pack a picnic basket and rug and relax in the gardens while the children enjoy the nature playground and maze.”

Division 7 Councillor Rowanne McKenzie said the Eco Markets in May would be followed by an Environment and Community Fair on Saturday 5 June, to mark World Environment Day.

“This will be a celebration where people can explore more about global conservation movements and how they can contribute to them with action at home,” Cr McKenzie said.

“The year’s theme is Ecosystem Restoration, which can take many forms, such as growing trees, greening cities, rewilding gardens, changing diets, or cleaning up rivers and coasts.

“With World Oceans Day falling on 8 June, the Environment and Community Fair will include marine environment groups and highlight the impact of single-use plastics on our ocean and marine life, encouraging reduced reliance on plastics leading into Plastic Free July.

“Redlands Coast is an amazing place to live, work and play, and I encourage everyone to come along and play in nature at these IndigiScapes events.”

EVENT DETAILS

FREE ENTRY

WHEN: 8am to noon – Saturday 1 May 2021; Saturday 5 June 2021; Saturday 4 September 2021; Saturday 4 December 2021

WHERE: 17 Runnymede Road, Capalaba. Additional parking available via the nursery and My Horizon entry

WHAT: Market stalls, live music, upcycled fashion, fresh produce, native nursery, cafe and more

MORE INFORMATION: indigiscapes.redland.qld.gov.au or 3829 8999

The events will operate under a COVID-safe plan

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Have your say on Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan


Redlands Coast residents can now have their say on Redland City Council’s four-year plan to boost recycling and reduce local waste going to landfill.

Council will open its draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 for four weeks of community consultation from 27 April.

Councillors have also endorsed in principle a longer term draft waste management plan developed by the SEQ Council of Mayors to guide a regional approach to waste management, which will be launched in May.

Mayor Karen Williams said all residents had a vested interest in how Council and its local government neighbours met waste reduction and recycling targets necessitated by significant changes in the waste sector in recent years.

“Better management of our waste and the greater uptake of recycling means more than just helping our environment and progressing to a zero-waste future, it is also critical to minimise extra costs to ratepayers,” Cr Williams said.

“In July 2019 the State Government introduced a waste levy in an attempt to reduce waste being sent to landfill.

“While this levy is currently subsidised by the State Government, we are concerned this subsidy may change in the future, making the investment into improved recycling a better use of community funds.

“Council’s draft plan, developed alongside the broader draft South-East Queensland Waste Management Plan, outlines how we can all work together to better use our existing kerbside waste, recycling and green waste services as efficiently as possible.

“Through it we will work to double the number of households with a green-waste bin for garden organics, as well as halve the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste bins.

“We also want to ensure everyone knows the importance of using the right bin and reduce the contamination in yellow-lid recycling bins that can undermine residents’ recycling efforts.

“Our aim is for 90 per cent of our community to be correctly recycling 90 per cent of their waste, 90 per cent of the time. This is what it will take to reach Queensland’s recycling target of 70 per cent by 2050, together with other industry action.”

Cr Williams said the draft plan relied on residents working with Council to reduce waste and increase recycling.

“The plan outlines a way we can collectively achieve waste reduction and recycling targets set by the Queensland Government,” she said.

“Community involvement is important to the success of the plan and achieving a collective impact on our waste management and a zero waste future for the Redlands Coast.

“Now that the consultation period has started, I encourage everyone to provide feedback on the priorities and initiatives identified in this draft plan.

“I know how passionate our community is about helping to look after our environment and keeping Redlands Coast naturally wonderful.

“So please take this opportunity to tell us what you think.”

Redland City Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 includes encouraging the improved use of the existing kerbside services such as:

  1. doubling the number of households with a green waste bin for garden organics
  2. halving the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste bins
  3. reducing contamination (non-recyclable materials) in the yellow-lid recycling
  4. ensuring everyone knows the importance of using the right bin.

Currently almost two-thirds of what goes in Redlands Coast red-lid waste bins could be kept out of landfill, including more than 10,000 tonnes a year of garden organics and 6,000 tonnes of other waste which could be recycled.

Visit Council’s Your Say website https://yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/  to read all about the draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 and have your say by 28 May 2021. As an added incentive, those who complete the online survey will have the chance to enter a competition draw to win one of 10 x$50 IndigiScapes vouchers (terms and conditions apply).

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Botanic discovery as fresh as a new daisy


A delicate new daisy has popped up on the Redlands Coast radar.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the Slender Bottle-daisy (Lagenophora gracilis) was found by the native nursery coordinator of Council’s IndigiScapes Centre during a recent seed collecting trip in the Leslie Harrison Conservation Area at Capalaba.

“The Community Bushcare team was out braving the heat to collect native plant seeds and fruits that the nursery needs for propagation when they came across this little flower alongside the path to the Leslie Harrison Dam,” Cr Williams said.

“It caught the eye of nursery coordinator Ben Webb who thought it looked unusual, so he took some photos and discovered this fragile flower has previously never been recorded as growing in Redlands Coast.

Council’s nursery coordinator, Ben Webb, with the fragile flower that caught his eye.

“The Slender Bottle-daisy does occur in eastern Australia but its normal habitat is the floor of eucalyptus forests.

“It’s possible it has been growing at the site for some time, but simply remained undiscovered because it’s not a high-traffic area and it wasn’t flowering. It was growing under heavy canopy so obviously needs a shady spot and a particular type of soil and light.”

Mr Webb has returned to the site to locate the plant again, check for flowers and seeds for hopeful propagation.

Redland City Division 9 Councillor Adelia Berridge said the Slender Bottle-daisy discovery was very exciting.

“We really want to encourage people to look after this fragile gem,” Cr Berridge said.

“Anyone in the Leslie Harrison Conservation Area might be lucky enough to see it for themselves, when it’s in flower.”

 

A close-up of the daisy which has a dark green rosette.

While Bushcare volunteers work to provide seeds and fruits required for propagation, the IndigiScapes nursery has a separate team of volunteers who help sort and propagate seeds along with Mr Webb.

More information about how to volunteer on these teams can be found on Council’s website, where a calendar details where and when future seed collection trips will take place throughout the year.

Cr Williams said the discovery has really highlighted a wonderful way volunteers could contribute to the knowledge and preservation of our Redlands Coast environment.

“Many of the Bushcare volunteers are regulars who have been collecting seeds on these trips for years, and so have built up a considerable level of expertise,” she said.

“The trips are also a chance for participants to socialise and get fitter in the outdoors, and to discover Redlands Coast reserves they haven’t been to before.”

If you have an interest in Council’s Indigiscapes Native Nursery and its programs please go to the website.

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