Category Archives: Council

Have your say on Beth Boyd Park upgrades


Redland City Council is inviting the Redlands Coast community to have a say on the upgrade of Thorneside’s Beth Boyd Park.

Mayor Karen Williams said Beth Boyd Park was a special area that had been enjoyed by generations of locals and visitors alike.

“This coastal park has been popular with many people for a long time and is now set to become even better,” she said.

“Before detailed design starts we want to hear what park upgrade works are important to the community.

“Perhaps it’s increased seating, pathways or shade, or a special foreshore experience or something else.

“This is the time for the community to also tell us what play theme, equipment and experiences they would like to see in the upgrades, and I encourage everyone to have their say.”

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said he looked forward to hearing what the community would like to enjoy at their park.

“This much-loved community park is in a sensitive natural area that is loved by people and supports significant native plants, birds and wildlife,” he said.

“Some park play elements are likely to remain, such as renewal of the hill slide and pedal swing, while other elements will be completely new.

“The upgrade will provide the whole community with new ways to interact with the foreshore.”

The boat needs to be removed due to poor structural integrity and its position within a road reserve, erosion-prone coastal protection area and high storm tide inundation area.

Cr Williams said Beth Boyd Park was part of a broader precinct that included Queens Esplanade and Aquatic Paradise Park West.

“The natural foreshore areas of this precinct are important to Redlands Coast, with responsibility for different parts of it falling under local, state and federal government jurisdictions,” she said.

“In addition to the Beth Boyd Park upgrades, new bike racks were recently installed at Aquatic Paradise Park West, and future plans include foreshore protection works along Queens Esplanade.

“Council invites community members to also tell us what they value about the precinct to help inform future planning for the broader area.”

For more information about the Thorneside precinct, or to have your say on what play experiences and improvements you think should be prioritised at Beth Boyd Park, visit yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au

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EKKA Redlands Coast Public Holiday Closures for 10 August, 2020


Council Offices & Customer Service Centres

Redland City Council offices and customer service centres will be closed on Monday 10 August 2020, returning to regular operating hours on Tuesday 11 August 2020.

Bin Collections

Normal bin services will occur on the public holiday. Remember to put your bin out the night before as trucks start collecting from 6am. If your bin has not been collected by 4pm, please contact us within 24 hours. To report a missed bin on Monday, please fill out the Missed bin collection request form, or phone the office on Tuesday 11 August on 3829 8999. For more information, visit the Missed Bin collection page on the website.

Recycling and Waste Centres

Birkdale: temporarily closed for site maintenance and upgrades.

Redland Bay: open from 7am-5pm (must arrive before 4.45pm).

Coochiemudlo Island: open 10am-12pm.

Karragarra Island: open during daylight hours.

Lamb Island: open during daylight hours.

North Stradbroke Island: open 8am-2pm.

Macleay Island: open 8am-2pm.

Russell island: open 8am-2pm.

Residents should check the website for all other opening times.

RecycleWorld Redland Bay

RecycleWorld Redland Bay is closed on Mondays. It is open Tuesdays and Fridays from 10am to 2pm.

Libraries

The Libraries and after-hours return chutes will be closed on Monday 10 August 2020. No items will be due during this time.

Redland Animal Shelter

The Redland Animal Shelter will be open 9am -12pm on the public holiday.

Redland IndigiScapes Centre & Nursery

Redland IndigiScapes Centre, nursery and cafe will be closed. Walking trails will remain open.

Redland Performing Arts Centre

The RPAC box office will be closed on Monday 10 August 2020, reopening at 10am on Tuesday 11 August 2020. For online bookings visit www.rpac.com.au

Redland Art Galleries

Redland Coast’s Art Galleries at Cleveland and Capalaba will both be closed on the public holiday and reopen at 9am Tuesday 11 August 2019.

Out of hours emergencies

For council-related emergencies, please phone 3829 8999.

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Charlie Buckler Sportsfield car park upgrade underway


Redland City Council has commenced construction on an $800,000 upgrade to the car park at Charlie Buckler Sportsfield on Boundary Road, Redland Bay.

Mayor Karen Williams said work started at the beginning of July and would include resurfacing as well as the installation of stormwater pipes, kerb and channelling, 14 street lights, footpaths and landscaping.

“The project supports Council’s $31 million budget commitment to enhancing and maintaining the city’s naturally wonderful parks, conservation areas and sports areas this financial year,” Cr Williams said.

Division 6 Councillor, Julie Talty said the Charlie Buckler Sportsfield car park was low lying and subject to flooding during and after heavy rain.

“The upgrade will go a long way to mitigating flooding and improving safety, and will be welcomed by the clubs that use and call the sports field home,” she said.

“This work is expected to be completed by the end of September, weather permitting, and is just the first of what is expected to be a multi-stage project, subject to future Council budgets.”

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Apply for a RADF grant today


Redland City Council is now accepting round one applications for 2020-2021 Regional Arts Development Fund (RADF) grants.

Mayor Karen Williams invited professional and emerging Redlands Coast artists to apply for funding from the RADF, a partnership between the Queensland Government and Redland City Council.

“Like so many things, the RADF schedule has seen pandemic-related disruption this year, but we’re back in business with submissions for round one grants being accepted until 31 August 2020,” Cr Williams said.

RADF Assessment Panel Co-chairs Cr Paul Bishop and Cr Lance Hewlett said the focus for this round was ‘People and Place’.

“We are looking for applications that creatively explore stories of people and place in Redlands Coast,” Cr Bishop said.

“Our stories have the power to teach, entertain and inspire and we are keen to see projects expressed through a range of media; including song, visual arts, dance, music, craft, writing, theatre and design.”

Cr Hewlett said the RADF provided opportunities for local communities to participate in arts and cultural activities, with funding of up to $10,000 per project available.

“I urge all Redlands Coast creatives to visit Council’s website for information about categories of funding, eligibility criteria and how to apply,” he said.

“Check out our videos of previous RADF grant recipients at www.redland.qld.gov.au/radf for some extra inspiration.”

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Local spend enhanced through Council’s strategic procurement model


Redland City Council has sharpened its focus on spending local as part of a new corporate procurement policy, contract manual and strategic contracting plan and procedures adopted this week.

Mayor Karen Williams said the focus on spending local was particularly relevant as Council reached out to support the broader community recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Council spends about $140 million per annum on goods and services and the new policy and procedures provide extra opportunities for Redlands Coast businesses.

“Council already increased its local procurement spend by about 4% last quarter.

“Now, with the newly adopted procurement policy and procedures, local supplier preference has been increased from a 10% to a 15% weighting in the evaluation process.

“This is on top of Council’s $3 million COVID recovery package, which included $370,000 to local community groups and businesses to help them respond to the COVID pandemic.”

Councillor Williams said the new systems also allowed for continuous innovation and improvement, with the capacity for multiyear contracts allowing for bulk-buying rates and flexibility around the end date of contracts.

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Redlands Coast park improvements opening soon


Mayor Karen Williams said there would be exciting new play spaces and equipment at Thornlands Community Park, Apex Park in Wellington Point and Raby Esplanade Park in Ormiston.

“The $2.1 million addition to Thornlands Community Park will open for the first day of school holidays, this Saturday 27 June,” Cr Williams said.

“The $770,000 upgrade to Raby Esplanade Park will follow mid-next week (approximately 1 July), weather permitting.

“Disappointingly, the opening of the $720,000 Apex Park upgrade has been pushed back due to vandalism, but we hope it won’t be too delayed.

“All of these upgrades are part of larger staged park projects that will see improvements to facilities for a cross section of visitors.”

Division 3 Councillor Paul Golle said he had watched with excitement as Thornlands Community Park, at the corner for Cleveland-Redland Bay Road and Waterline Boulevard, had emerged from what was just a grassy patch in April 2018.

“The new all abilities play space will feature a double flying fox, water auger and mud pit; and incorporate additional picnic settings, barbeques, shade, and seating all within a fully fenced area,” Cr Golle said.

“This coming financial year (2020/21) will see the inclusion of an extra agricultural themed mounded play area for climbing, sliding and tunnelling within the fenced play area and fitness equipment outside.”

Division 1 Councillor Wendy Boglary said she was looking forward to the upcoming openings of the revamped play areas at both Apex Park and Raby Esplanade Park.

“In a first for Redlands Coast parks, Apex Park at Starkey Street, Wellington Point will include an in-ground trampoline,” she said.

“Along with the addition of a climbing unit and fairy play space, the much loved flying fox will be renewed.

“Raby Esplanade Park, Ormiston will reopen with a nautical themed play space, a shipping container stacked play tower and a created creek bed featuring water pumps and sluice gates.

“The exciting new hamster wheel will be another first for the Redlands Coast children to enjoy.”

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Record $327m budget investment in Redlands Coast


Restarting Redlands Coast is at the heart of Council’s record $327 million COVID-affected budget for 2020-21 which provides a $3 million safety net for those most impacted by the pandemic.

The budget includes an expanded $80 million capital investment in the city aimed at generating and preserving local jobs and adding to and sustaining vital community infrastructure and services.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said it was expected Council’s finances would take a multi-million-dollar hit from COVID, including $3 million in COVID recovery funding that had been allocated to help the city recover from the pandemic.

“Right now we need money spent in our city and, with Council being one of Redland Coast’s largest employers, we are taking up the challenge by ensuring local money creates local jobs,” Cr Williams said.

“Council has been diligent in maintaining low levels of debt and a strong balance sheet over the years in preparation for a rainy day and the rain has arrived, so with local businesses struggling we are going to spend local to keep locals employed.

“A significant part of this record spend is thanks to the strong financial reserves that we built for a situation such as this.

“We are also topping up our COVID recovery fund by a further $1 million, providing a total of $3 million safety net to be used by those most impacted by the pandemic.

“While some Councils have chosen to spread rate relief broadly, we have adopted a deliberate strategy of supporting those who need it most by keeping money aside to provide relief when that need is better understood,” Cr Williams said.

“We know the full impacts of the COVID pandemic won’t be known until later this year when support like the Federal Government’s Job Keeper program have ended and this funding will allow us to do that.

“This may be through rates relief, business support or grants to the community; we will keep an eye on the impacts and have that money on hand to respond when and where it is needed most.”

Cr Williams said Council would absorb as much of the COVID impacts as possible, without passing on the impact to residents.

“We will do this by adopting an operating deficit budget and keeping the increase in general rates revenue to 2.99 percent taking in all rating categories – or about 62 cents a week for a typical category 1a, owner-occupied household, excluding separate charges, utilities and State Government charges.

“The extra money collected in rates through this year’s increase will contribute towards further COVID-19 recovery measures to help areas hardest hit by the pandemic response.

“We have also reduced other charges, with the environment separate charge down 4.7 percent and the landfill remediate charge down almost 26 percent.”

Cr Williams said as part of its COVID response Council had strengthened its focus on spending locally to help stimulate the economy.

“It is about getting people out an about again, getting the economy moving, supporting residents, backing businesses, restoring the climate for local employment and creating opportunity.

“It has allowed us to offer total pensioner rates and utilities rebates of almost $3.5 million, with rates rebates of $335 a year for a full pensioner or $167.50 for a part-pensioner.”

Cr Williams said it was disappointing the State Government had increased bulk water costs by a further 6.4 per cent, meaning the city’s total bulk water costs were now $43.4 million.

“This increase is on top of hefty increases over the last three years and comes despite us asking the State to hold bulk water costs to help residents respond to the COVID pandemic.

“To put this in perspective, the city’s bulk water bill is more than half of what we will spend in our capital expenditure program to provide vital community infrastructure.

“Despite this increase Council has kept its retail water consumption increase to just 2.13 percent.”

The 2020-21 budget at a glance:

  • Record $327 million investment in Redlands Coast.
  • An increase in general rates revenue of 2.99 percent taking in all rating categories – or about 62 cents a week for a typical category 1a, owner-occupied household, excluding separate charges, utilities and State Government charges.
  • Capital expenditure of almost $80 million.
  • The State Government’s bulk water charge, over which Council has no control, increases by about $36 for the average ratepayer to fund a total cost of almost $43.4 million this year.
  • Environment separate charge down 4.7 percent and the landfill remediation charge down almost 26 percent – a reduction of $16 on last year for both charges.
  • Council’s retail water consumption charge up by about 2.13 percent.
  • Total pensioner rebates rises to almost $3 million, with rates rebates of $335 a year for a full pensioner or $167.50 for a part-pensioner and other utility charge remissions and rebates totaling $467,000.

Capital expenditure program at a glance:

  • $30 million for transport, roads and traffic projects.
  • $3.2 million for other infrastructure projects.
  • $10.2 million for marine and foreshore projects, including canal and breakwater works.
  • $12.7 million for water, waste and wastewater projects.
  • $13.8 million for parks, open space and conservation.
  • $2 million for community and cultural development.

Go to our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for full budget information.

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Councillors and senior officers forgo pay rise


Redland City Councillors have forgone a pay rise at the Special Budget Meeting today, saving the City $25,137.

Mayor Karen Williams said Councillors unanimously voted to not accept the remuneration set out for Councillors by the Local Government Remuneration Commission for the 2020/21 financial year.

“Considering the hardship being experience by some of our residents and business community, we could not in good conscience accept a pay rise,” she said.

Cr Williams said the decision by Councillors had been further supported by Council’s senior and executive officers who had also proactively agreed to not accept a pay increase.

“The combined impact of Councillors and Council’s 22 senior officers not accepting a pay increase will save residents about $150,000, which in the current economic environment will be welcome news for the community,” she said.

“Council has worked hard to deliver stimulus packages to ease the burden of locals where possible.

“While our salary savings may not seem a lot in the grand scheme of things, it is a statement of our solidarity with the Redlands Coast community.”

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New security cameras for Capalaba Place and Wellington Point


Security has been enhanced at Capalaba Place, with Council recently installing 31 security cameras in the area, while another five cameras have been installed at Wellington Point.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council had worked closely with the Federal and State governments to secure funding for the security upgrades.

“Council received $60,944 towards the security camera installations in Capalaba as part of a grant from the Federal Government’s Safer Communities Fund, which also included recent camera installations at Weinam Creek, Redland Bay,” she said.

“For the Wellington Point cameras, we have received $25,350 in funding from the State’s Department of Local Government, Racing and Multicultural Affairs under the Local Government Grants and Subsidies Program.

“We now also have a Memorandum of Understanding between Council, Translink and the Queensland Police Service so any footage captured by these cameras can be shared.”

Division 8 Councillor Tracey Huges said the cameras at Capalaba Place were the culmination of a lot of work by Council, police and traders to help maintain safety in the area between the shopping centres.

“The safety of bus drivers and their passengers at the Capalaba bus interchange will be increased thanks to these cameras,” she said.

“We can now help monitor what is happening in this area.

“With 19 cameras now in operation at the interchange and an additional 12 cameras around the library and green space areas, they will certainly help deter anti-social behaviour.”

Division 1 Councillor Wendy Boglary said installation of the security cameras in Wellington Point would be welcomed by residents and business owners alike.

“For residents, regular hooning late at night has been an ongoing issue, and having the latest high-tech cameras with license plate recognition software will certainly help the police identify the culprits,” she said.

“Business owners also can look forward to the added security and deterrent that having this network of cameras will bring.

“This has been a long process, with firstly having to get a Security Camera Policy through Council, so to finally see the cameras installed is a great relief.”

Cr Williams thanked the Federal and State governments for their investment in Redlands Coast.

“While cameras may act as a deterrent to anti-social behaviour, they are no substitute for community vigilance.

“Anyone who witnesses behaviour they believe to be illegal should report it to Policelink on 131 444.”

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Setting the record straight – SMBI land


Please be aware of incorrect media reports recently that Council is selling more than 4200 blocks of surplus land on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands and North Stradbroke Island.

This is inaccurate.

You won’t find more than 4200 blocks of Council land for sale for $15,000 on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands and you won’t find any Council land for sale on North Stradbroke Island.

Redland City Council on 10 June made a procedural change to put a policy around sale of surplus land on the four Southern Moreton Bay Islands of Macleay, Russell, Lamb and Karragarra islands. North Stradbroke Island is not included.

Council is not proactively selling off land, but has put in place a process for adjoining neighbours to go through at their cost and at market value should they wish to purchase an adjoining piece of land owned by Council and which is surplus to Council needs.

When people have asked before to buy this land next to them, Council has not had a streamlined process.

Previously a report needed to go to Council for each sale, which made it time consuming and resource intensive.

The number of properties that could be eligible for application by an adjoining property owner is about 345 – not the more than 4200 referred to in The Courier-Mail and which Council owns overall on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands.

Any property owners wishing to purchase the land would need to amalgamate it with their current land to obtain a larger yard.

It cannot be subdivided.

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