Category Archives: Environment

Young koalas stepping out into the world


A new generation of Redlands Coast koalas is stepping out into the world with the annual dispersal of young that precedes koala breeding season each year.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said residents and motorists should be on the lookout for smaller koalas, which were likely to pop up in the most unexpected spots.

“Often mistaken for lost joeys, these young koalas are usually about 18 months old and leaving their mothers’ territories is search of their own,” Cr Williams said.

A youngster recently spotted at Cleveland State School.

“As they make their way in the world, they will travel through bushland, backyards and across roads; exploring the terrain on foot and using all sorts of trees, not just Eucalypts.”

“To help young koalas travel safely, I encourage residents to keep their distance and confine or restrain their dogs at night; and motorists are urged to slow down and be alert for koala movement.”

How you can help young dispersing koalas:
• Let them continue on their way without interference, as your “help” can confuse them and lead to unexpected danger.
• Keep your distance and confine or restrain you dogs at night to allow safe movement.
• Make your backyard more koala friendly by putting a wooden pole or ladder against your fence so they can continue on through and a floating water aid in your pool so they can climb out if they fall in.
• When driving, slow down and be alert to wildlife movement from road sides.
• If you are worried about the health or welfare of any koala phone the Redlands 24-hour Wildlife Rescue Service on 3833 4031.

For more information on our local koalas, including how to spot a sick or injured koala, visit Council’s koala webpage

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Council venues reopening as COVID-19 restrictions ease


Redland Art Gallery (RAG), Cleveland and IndigiScapes are all set to reopen to the public on Monday 15 June, with RecycleWorld following the next day.

Mayor Karen Williams said she was delighted that more Council venues would soon be ready to receive visitors in line with Stage 2 of the Queensland Government’s Roadmap to Easing COVID-19 Restrictions.

“While some of our Council venues were able to quickly reopen after the Stage 2 easing of restrictions was brought forward, others are still gearing up to reopen to our community as safely as possible,” Cr Williams said.

“We welcomed the State Government’s decision to bring forward Stage 2, but the lack of notice has meant some slight delays.”

Councillor Williams said art gallery visitors were in for a treat with a revised program of exhibitions being released for the rest of this calendar year.

“Two new exhibitions will run in the Cleveland Gallery from 15 June until 2 August,” she said.

Redland Art Awards: Works acquired 2006-2018 will highlight 14 wonderful artworks held in the RAG Collections acquired from the gallery’s prestigious biennial contemporary painting competition.

Breathing Space is a selection of RAG Collection works that encourage us to stop, relax and reconnect with Redlands Coast on Quandamooka Country.”

Image: Julie Reeves, Dark garden 4 2007, oil on canvas. Redland Art Gallery Collection. Donated through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program by Julie Reeves, 2012. Courtesy of the artist. Photography by Carl Warner.

Council venues – reopening dates and conditions

Redland Art Gallery (RAG), Cleveland will reopen on Monday 15 June with two exhibitions:
• Redland Art Awards: Works acquired 2006-2018
• Breathing Space: Taking time out with the RAG Collection

Conditions in place:
• As a maximum of 20 people is currently permitted, gallery employees will regulate visitor entry.
• There will be no public seating available.
• You can now view exhibitions at the Cleveland gallery in person, with children’s art and craft still activities available online at http://artgallery.redland.qld.gov.au

Redlands IndigiScapes Centre will reopen on Monday 15 June.

The Discovery Centre, gift shop, nursery and café will all reopen, with the flow of visitors being regulated to ensure compliance with social distancing rules.

• Centre opening (including gift shop) hours: 10am – 4pm daily
• Nursery opening hours: 10am – 3pm weekdays
• Café opening hours: three set seating times with modified menu for dining in (bookings essential, limited take-away options will be available):

  • Morning tea: 10am –11.30am
  • Lunch:  12pm -1.30pm
  • Afternoon tea: 2pm – 3pm

Discovery Centre opening hours: three sessions daily, aligned with café seating times.

Phone 3824 8611 for café bookings.

RecycleWorld at Redland Bay Recycle and Waste Centre will reopen on Tuesday 16 June.

Opening hours: Tuesdays and Fridays (instead of Saturdays), 10am – 2pm
• 10am – 12 noon: pedestrian entry only through the loading bay gate. Purchases (other than large items) will need to be carried out by customers via the pedestrian footpath.
• 12 noon – 2pm: vehicle pick up of large items from the loading bay.

Conditions in place:
• Entry will be regulated due to current gathering rules. Visitors can expect queues on entry and payment.
• If the carpark is full, customers may be asked to return later.
• Payment via EFT only.
• Footwear must be worn (this is an existing safety measure).
For full list of conditions: https://www.redland.qld.gov.au/info/20189/waste_transfer_stations/334/recycleworld

All Council venues

• Council venues being reopened will provide safe and welcoming spaces for the Redlands Coast community and visitors.
• Cleaning will be increased, sanitiser will be available and social distancing measures will be in place.
• Conditions at all venues will be reviewed again when Queensland reaches Stage 3 in the easing of restrictions roadmap.

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Council seeks community input on coastal strategy


Redland City Council is inviting community members to provide input into Phase 6 of its Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy.

A city-wide strategy for the protection of the city’s coastline, including islands and inland rivers and creeks; the project will assess the vulnerability of infrastructure, assets and property to coastal hazards, and recommend actions to help adapt and manage these risks.

As part of the project’s next phase, Council is conducting an online survey seeking feedback from community members on what they value most about Redlands Coast, plus their understanding and any experiences of coastal hazards.

Mayor Karen Williams, who is also chairperson of the project’s steering committee, said the next phase involved identifying options that would help Redlands Coast adapt to, and be protected from, potential hazards such as coastal erosion, storm tide inundation, and sea level rise to the years 2070 and 2100.

“I’m very proud of this project and I’m looking forward to its completion later this year,” Cr Williams said.

“Council and project stakeholders have worked hard in developing the Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy, and this next phase calls for the community to provide invaluable input to help inform the strategy’s recommended actions.

“Redlands Coast residents should feel confident knowing Council will have a plan in place to help protect our coastal lifestyle, Indigenous cultural heritage, and to guide the adaptation of private property and public infrastructure.”

Development of the strategy is overseen by the project’s steering committee, and is developed in consultation with the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation, key asset owners and stakeholder bodies, and the wider Redlands Coast community.

For more information about the strategy and to take the online survey, please visit the project page at yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/CHAS

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Enjoy safely all that Redlands Coast has to offer


There’s a lot to do at Redlands Coast as restrictions ease and we head into the cooler months that are perfect for hiking, cycling and exploring.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said that with people able to travel up to 150km from tomorrow, Saturday 16 May 2020, there were  many naturally wonderful hidden treasures and little adventures to explore on Redlands Coast.

“Please remember to exercise social distancing and buy local where you can,” Cr Williams said.

So what will it be for you this weekend?

Redlands Coast has everything from hiking in the bush at Venman Bushland National Park at Mt Cotton, to the all-abilities playground at Capalaba Regional Park to the King Island walk at Wellington Point Recreation Reserve.

Mountain bikers can get an adrenalin rush on the tracks at Redlands Track Park at Cleveland while all cyclists can enjoy the Moreton Bay Cycleway from Thorneside through Wellington Point and Cleveland to Victoria Point and Redland Bay.

You can also get out on our waterways kayaking, windsurfing, paddle boarding or boating, with restrictions removed from Saturday 16 May 2020 for boating around North Stradbroke Island.

All Redlands Coast Islands are also open for day trippers, with restrictions on North Stradbroke Island lifted on Saturday 16 May 2020.

Venman Bushland National Park

West Mount Cotton Road, Mount Cotton (Jungalpin/Tungipin)

Within the beautiful hinterland of Mount Cotton you’ll discover this reserve, with a variety of walking tracks amongst the forest of eucalypt and melaleuca trees. You may even be lucky and spot a koala so keep an eye out! The reserve also acts as a haven for many other native animals including greater gliders, powerful owls and red-necked wallabies, so it is the perfect place to explore.

Raby Bay Foreshore Park

Masthead Drive, Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie)

Raby Bay Foreshore Park boasts sprawling parklands with sandy beaches, a playground and scenic walking and bike paths. It’s a great place to take the family to cool off, enjoy a picnic and relax overlooking the bay. The calm waters are suitable for swimming and you can hire a kayak or stand-up paddle board right on the shore. Coffee, drinks and snacks are available from the coffee trailer. Don’t forget your furry friends. The park is dog-friendly, with a popular designated off-leash beach area.

Wellington Point Recreation Reserve

Main Road, Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen)

Wind surfing, stand up paddle boarding, kayaking, boating and coastal fishing are just some of the water activities that entice people from far and wide to the Wellington Point peninsula.

Surrounded by coast on three sides, Wellington Point Reserve is popular for picnics, launching a boat into Moreton Bay, and, at low tide, walking to King Island – home to an abundance of coastal wildlife.

Scattered with historic Moreton Bay Fig Trees, with a sandy beach, wooden jetty and brilliants, it is an Instagrammers delight.

Children love the established playgrounds that weave among the shade of Moreton Bay fig trees while the adjacent café and takeaway store offers a great menu and superb view.

King Island Walk

Main Road, Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen)

‘Walking on water’ across the spectacular low-tide sand bridge from Wellington Point to King Island is a Redlands Coast signature experience and one of the most unique walks in South-east Queensland.

A stunning sand causeway emerges from beneath the Moreton Bay waters between the Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen) mainland and the tiny, uninhabited King Island at low-tide, forming a natural bridge for walkers.

It’s a 2km return walk – great for kids who can paddle along the way and spot birds and crabs and you can take your dog (on leash) on week days too.

Make sure you check tide times before you head out too – it’s a strictly low-tide affair.

Put this one on your weekend bucket list for some time soon!

Cleveland Point Recreation Reserve

Shore St West, Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie)

With magnificent Moreton Bay on three sides, Cleveland Point is one of the most iconic, must-visit sites on Redlands Coast.

Cleveland Point is family-friendly with a park, children’s playground, shaded picnic areas and toilets, plus a picturesque pathway around the point for leisurely strolls and cycles – it has a significant link to the city’s past too with the historic Cleveland Point Lighthouse, a Redlands Coast and South-east Queensland icon.

There are plenty of reasons to stop and stay a while at the Cleveland Point Reserve too. Aside from the picturesque location and mesmerising views, the fish and chippery serves up great seafood.

Moreton Bay Cycleway

Redlands Coast

Start at Thorneside or at the other end at Redland Bay and cycle through Redlands Coast’s naturally wonderful villages taking in taking in the unique coastline and mangrove vegetation.

Redlands Track Park

Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie) and Alexandra Hills

Looking to discover a new coast this weekend? You can in Redlands Coast. The Redlands Track Park is a multi-use trail for mountain biking, walking and cycling. You may even spot a wallaby or two in the Scribbly Gum Conservation area. Add some excitement to your day by exploring the Scorpion Rock, the Hammer, and the Upper and Lower Magic trails.

IndigiScapes Centre

Runnymede Road, Capalaba (Kapallaba)

Immerse yourself in nature at Redlands Coast’s environmental education centre. Whilst the IndigiScapes building and café might be closed, you can still make the most of the tracks and trails that wind their way through the native bushland that surrounds the centre. Wander the paths that lead you through unspoilt greenery and follow the banks of Coolnwynpin Creek, or stroll the native botanical gardens and get inspiration for your own backyard. There is plenty of space for you to you pull up a picnic, and a playground for those looking to burn some energy! Keep an eye out for the local wildlife that like to call the area home – if you’re lucky you might spot swamp wallabies, lizards and an array of native birds.

For more places to discover on Redlands Coast visit visitredlandscoast.com.au.

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Stay safe as COVID-19 restrictions ease


With some COVID-19 restrictions being relaxed by the State Government this weekend, Redland City Mayor Karen Williams has urged Redlands Coast residents to continue to keep their distance and adhere to the rules still in place.

“I sincerely thank Redlands Coast residents for really stepping up and following the restrictions we’ve all been living under,” Cr Williams said.

“There’s no doubt that our collective efforts have helped to stop the spread of COVID-19 in our community.

“While it will be wonderful to be able to get out a bit more, the COVID-19 pandemic is far from over and we cannot risk undoing all our good work and putting our families, our colleagues, our community and ourselves at risk.

Under the new State Government directive, from tomorrow Saturday 2 May, in addition to your outdoor exercise, you’ll be able to:

  •  Travel within 50 kilometres of your home
  • Have a picnic in a park
  • Sit on a park bench and enjoy your lunch or a coffee
  • Have a driving lesson with a member of your household
  • Go on a motorbike ride or boat trip
  • Go shopping for non-essential items.

Despite the new State Government directions, Cr Williams asked residents to remember that the current gathering and social distancing rules still apply.

“In Redlands Coast, our barbecues, exercise equipment, playground equipment, table and chair sets and fully fenced dog off leash areas continue to be closed for the safety of the community.

Our unfenced or partially fenced dog offleash areas remain open.

“So if you are planning a picnic, bring a picnic rug or chairs or sit on one of our park bench seats.”

“Our Council-owned tennis courts will be re-open to the public this Saturday, with the gates “locked open” so people don’t have to touch them.”

Cr Williams said North Stradbroke Island was still a no-go for visitors.

“The Queensland Government’s travel ban specific to North Stradbroke Island remains in place, meaning travel, including by private boats, continues to be strictly prohibited except for permanent Straddie residents and those undertaking essential travel to and from the island,” She said.

“Non-essential travel includes holidays (even if you own a holiday home), recreation, tourism and general socialising with friends and family.

“Anyone travelling to Straddie still needs to show their ID.

“The 100 metre marine exclusion zone for the waters around North Stradbroke Island is still in place and recreational boats will be moved on by authorities.

“While there is no travel ban for our other islands I urge everyone to use common sense; it would be disappointing to see large crowds heading to our islands and potentially dangerous.

“Now is not the time for island hopping, please be respectful of those vulnerable residents on these islands.”

Further information: Council’s website redland.qld.gov.au/COVID19

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Use of fire pits on Redlands Coast


On Redlands Coast fire pits are allowed as long precautions are taken to prevent the spread of fire. This means the fire pit:

  • Cannot exceed 2m in width or length
  • Must be enclosed to prevent the escape of fire or any burning material
  • Must not cause a smoke nuisance, and
  • Is lit outdoors for the purpose of cooking or warmth

For more information: Council’s Smoke Nuisance Factsheet for Open Air Fires http://www.redland.qld.gov.au/download/downloads/id/2026/smoke_nuisance_%E2%80%93_open_air_fires.pdf

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Social distancing measures at waste transfer stations


Redland City Council has put measures in place at its waste transfer stations to help slow the spread of COVID-19 on Redlands Coast.

The new, temporary rules will help keep residents, employees and commercial users of the waste transfer stations safe and ensure that social distancing requirements can be met.

Council advises the average tip run may take longer than usual, and is asking that people remain patient, as the measures are there to protect everyone.

Temporary measures in place at Council’s waste transfer stations include:

  • Vehicle restrictions on entry  to maintain social distancing
  • Visitors and staff must keep a distance of 1.5 meters from all other people
  • No more than two people are permitted per unloading area at any one time
  • Payment via EFT or account only – no cash payments accepted.

Household kerbside collections of general waste, green waste and recycling will continue unaffected.

Residents should consider whether they could avoid visiting a waste transfer station at this time by fully utilising their household collection services and getting creative with waste.

Some ideas include:

  • Consider what waste you are generating and perhaps delay those projects.
  • Set-up a separate recycling station in your home to keep the right things inside the yellow-lid bin – only paper, cardboard, aluminium, hard plastic and metal.
  • Start composting food scraps to make room in your red-lid waste bin. The up-side is free compost for your garden.
  • Get creative and turn that ‘junk’ into your next up-cycle project. What you thought was rubbish could turn into a new hobby.
  • Find a place to store excess to delay your tip trip.

To stay informed about local impacts of the coronavirus, and a list of frequently asked questions, visit redland.qld.gov.au/COVID-19

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Redlands Coast participates in international City Nature Challenge


Redlands Coast residents are being urged to get involved with the 2020 City Nature Challenge by simply snapping and uploading images of local plants and animals between 23 and 27 April.

The Australian Citizen Science Association has entered Redlands Coast into this international competition – which is akin to a giant game of environmental eye-spy – with support being provided by the newly re-opened Redlands IndigiScapes Centre.

What started in 2016 as an intercity competition between Los Angeles and San Francisco has now gone global. All urbanites are being encouraged to document as many plants and animals as possible to better understand urban biodiversity and share their discoveries with the rest of the world.

To encourage community participation, IndigiScapes will host a free community workshop to provide photographic tips and explore the iNaturalist App ahead of the challenge.

The City Nature Challenge Photography and iNaturalist App Workshop will be held at IndigiScapes from 4-6pm, Saturday 21 March 2020.

Alternatively, residents can independently participate in the challenge by downloading the iNaturalist app from AppStore or Google Play, signing in and starting to share observations.

Species submitted will be identified by challenge organisers from 28 April until 3 May 2020 with the results being released on 4 May 2020.

The City Nature Challenge Photography and iNaturalist App Workshop
Where: Redlands IndigiScapes Centre, 17 Runnymede Road, Capalaba
When: Saturday 21 March, 4 to 6pm.
Bring: Workshop attendees will need to bring along a mobile phone, camera or tablet computer and wear enclosed shoes.
RSVP: Phone 3824 8611 or email indigiscapes@redland.qld.gov.au by Wednesday 18 March to secure your spot at the workshop.

For more information visit the 2020 City Nature Challenge website.

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Redland City Council calls in the Toadinator


Redland City Council will trial two advanced cane-toad management systems as part of its integrated control program for the pests.

The trial, which supports work being done through Council’s Environmental Partnership Program, will involve using Toadinator traps to capture adult females before they breed, as well as funnel traps baited with a newly developed product irresistible to cane toad tadpoles.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the first step in managing cane toad numbers focussed on working with landowners through Council’s Environmental Partnership Program to thickly vegetate around water bodies as a barrier to potential breeding sites.

Senior Habitat Protection Officer Maree Manby shows Mayor Karen Williams a Toadinator cane toad trap.

Toadinator cane toad traps, which will be used in a Redland City Council trial, are designed to attract and catch adult female cane toads.

“While we are currently seeing a large number of cane toad toadlets due to recent rains, Council has for some years been working closely with landowners across the city through our Environmental Partnerships Program to manage cane toads on their properties,” Cr Williams said.

“We are also about to begin a trial of a small number of Toadinator cane toad traps, which are designed to attract and catch adult female cane toads which can then be removed and disposed of humanely.

“The traps, which allow cane toads to enter but not exit, have a solar-powered light to attract insects and a cane toad caller to call in the females. The caller and lights come on at night when toads are most active and then automatically turn off during the day.

“Research and tests by Australian Control Technologies (Australia) working with James Cook University show they can have a much bigger impact on cane toad numbers than catching cane toads and tadpoles individually.”

Toadinator cane toad traps are also commercially available to residents who want to buy their own.

Cr Williams said the third part to the control approach would be the use of funnel traps baited with tablets which attract cane toad tadpoles.

“Council has recently partnered with the University of Queensland’s Cane Toad Challenge project to obtain access to this new technological advancement in toad control,” she said.

“The university identified the cane toads’ own toxin could be used to attract cane toad tadpoles and then created a bait called Bufo Tabs, which draw them in large numbers.

“The traps are placed in shallow water where cane toad tadpoles congregate, with one tablet able to attract hundreds to thousands of tadpoles in just a few hours, should they be prevalent in those numbers.”

Cr Williams said it was hoped the trials would lead to the wider adoption of new systems to tackle the 0.5% of individual cane toads that survived to reproduce after hatching.

Cane toad and cane toad tadpole numbers caught will be recorded and they will then be disposed of humanely. Cooling in a fridge, followed by freezing and disposal on bin day is one method of humane disposal.

Residents choosing to remove cane toads and cane toad tadpoles from their own properties should remember that cane toads have poisonous glands, so appropriate personal protective equipment should be used. Also, please keep your pets safe and do not allow them to have access to cane toads.

Visit the state Department of Agriculture and Fisheries website for more information on cane toads.

For more information about Council’s Environmental Partnerships Programs, or the upcoming trial, contact the IndigiScapes Environmental Education Centre on 3824 8611.

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Bayview Conservation Area and Redland Track Park re-opens


Bayview Conservation Area and Redland Track Park has re-opened today.

Some trails may have damp spots, please be gentle or avoid these areas if possible to give them time to harden up.

Trail users should also exercise caution and expect to find fallen trees, exposed roots, ruts or other hazards in both single trail and fire trails.

If you happen to come across small debris it would be helpful if trail users could move it off to the side. Larger debris such as trees (that would require a saw) should be reported to Council using the Report a Problem form or by calling customer service on (07) 3829 8999.

Officers are continuing to assess damage and are taking the appropriate steps to carry out repairs in due course.

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