Category Archives: Environment

Spooky Halloween fun on Redlands Coast


UPDATE 23 November: Movie in the Park event cancelled due to wet weather forecast

There’s always plenty to do on naturally wonderful Redlands Coast and Halloween is no exception.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said kids – big and small – were already starting to plan their costumes and activities for some wonderfully spooky fun on and around Saturday 31 October.

“Redlands Coast has a range of community events and activities from which to choose, whatever your interest,” she said.

“Our wonderful local shopping centres and traders have increasingly got into the spirit of Halloween over the years, handing out goodies to little ones whose parents prefer not to door knock.

“This year Victoria Point Shopping Centre has gone a step further, bringing to life augmented reality characters through the Redlands Coast Deals and Rewards App, a free mobile phone app aimed at promoting local businesses and rewarding their customers.

“This will be a fun new use for the Redlands Coast App, which was developed by Redland City Council and has already been download 1574 times for shopping in the city.

“If you are heading to Victoria Point Shopping Centre for Halloween, download the app from the Apple App Store or Google Play in order to spot the friendly monsters and participate in the virtual trick or treating with real treats up for grabs.”

Councillor Williams said there would also be activities around Redlands Coast for nature lovers and movie and history buffs.

“Nature lovers will be able to head to IndigiScapes – Council’s environmental education centre – to learn about our fascinating flying foxes and meet an adorable flying-fox pup from 10am-2pm, 31 October,” she said.

“The team from Bat Conservation and Rescue Queensland will talk about the ways of these crucial pollinators and kids can make a batty badge to take home.

“Redlands Museum and Theatre Redlands are hosting a spine-tingling Halloween Night Walk from 6pm, Friday 30 October.

“This event is not for the faint hearted, with a minimum age of 13 and prior bookings essential.

“Movie buffs can get their fix at Redland Performing Arts Centre (RPAC) on Saturday 31 October, where there’ll be an 11am and 2pm screening of Australian thriller Dead Calm. Prior bookings at www.rpac.com.au are essential.

“And in the lead up to Halloween, a free movies in the park event featuring Hotel Transylvania is planned for Saturday 24 October at William Stewart Park, Thornlands.

“There’s no excuse to stay home this Halloween so head out for some socially-distanced fun.”

Visit the What’s On community calendar on Council’s website for more information on what’s happening on Redlands Coast.

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Help build our regional circular economy and reduced landfill with the ASPIRE digital trading platform


Redland City Council has joined with neighbouring Gold Coast and Logan councils and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland (CCIQ) to trial an online platform local businesses can use to source and dispose of unwanted items that would normally go to landfill.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the 12 month ASPIRE digital platform trial had the potential to bolster local business and deliver environmental and economic benefits for the region.

“Under the CCIQ ecoBiz ASPIRE Pilot, Redlands Coast businesses with fewer than 100 employees will have free access to ASPIRE’s easy-to-use tool for trading items that may otherwise end up in landfill,” Cr Williams said.

“As a former small business owner myself, I know that what is no longer useful to one organisation can become a cost-effective manufacturing input – or salvaging opportunity – for another, so this is a great initiative.

“The ASPIRE platform has been instrumental is repurposing items such as old carpet underlay, used office chairs, flat car batteries, animal waste, and more.

“Redlands Coast has an innovative business sector and I have no doubt plenty of local business leaders will use this platform to continue serving the community.

“While the ASPIRE interface is user-friendly, its database uses complex algorithms to connect those who have waste products to dispose of with those who can reuse, repair, remake and recycle the products; which translates into revenue, cost savings, resource recovery and environmental benefits for all.

“What’s particularly exciting is the regional scope of the CCIQ ecoBiz ASPIRE Pilot, with Gold Coast and Logan councils also coming on board.

“This will increase the available trading partners and goods on offer locally, making for a robust online marketplace to develop our regional circular economy.”

Fantastic benefits for businesses include:
• Waste disposal cost savings (including the State Government’s Waste Disposal Levy)
• Potential to trade waste and earn revenue
• Diversion of renewable resources from landfill
• Creation of new supply chains
• CO2 emission savings.

Cr Williams said the ASPIRE platform was already up and running, so interested business operators could jump online the ASPIRE website for a look around, and to view helpful online tutorials and register.

“Our official Redlands Coast launch will be during National Recycling Week at the 2020 Redlands Coast Business and Jobs Expo, where you can stop by the Redland City Council stand, talk to our officers and see a demonstration,” she said.

“This continues Council’s commitment to partnering with local businesses, including the recently launched Championing Redlands Coast initiative.“

Official ASPIRE trial Launch
When: Thursday 19 November 2020
Where: 2020 Redlands Coast Business and Jobs Expo, Alexandra Hills Hotel

For more information and assistance with tapping into this exciting business opportunity, contact Council’s Economic Development team on 3829 8999.

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Recycle e-waste in exchange for a native tree


Redland City Council is encouraging mainland residents to recycle their e-waste and swap it for a free native tree.

Mayor Karen Williams said the initiative would help raise awareness of e-waste recycling to mark International E-Waste Day on 14 October 2020, with a twofold benefit.

“Council hopes to collect 20 tonnes of e-waste from 14 to 18 October and aims to give away about 500 trees in exchange over the same period,” she said.

“Not only will Council be able to recycle this e-waste, thus reducing our carbon emissions, there will also be positive environmental impacts through the planting of hundreds of native trees throughout Redlands Coast.”

Cr Williams said Council was committed to reducing the amount of e-waste going to landfill.

“E-waste is one of the fastest growing waste streams globally and in the last financial year Council received 256 tonnes of e-waste,” she said.

“All items collected are taken to a facility where they are pulled apart and the various components of glass, plastic, wire and metal are sent for recycling; in fact almost 95 per cent of the materials are recovered for further use.

“Council ran a similar e-waste collection drive for island residents in February 2020 and collected more than two tonnes of e-waste, and we plan to hold another drive in February 2021.”

The trees for e-waste campaign runs from 14 to 18 October at Redland Bay and Birkdale recycling and waste centres.

Both are open every day from 7am to 5.30pm.

There is a limit of one tree per household in exchange for e-waste, and there are about 250 tree vouchers available at both recycling and waste centres.

Trees can be collected from either IndigiScapes Nursery on weekdays or IndigiScapes Centre on weekends.

Council accepts e-waste year round at its two mainland recycling and waste centres at Redland Bay and Birkdale, and runs annual collection drives to the island centres.

E-waste items suitable for recycling include:

  • TVs, interactive displays, digital displays, data projectors, video and tape players
  • Computer equipment: desktops/workstations, monitors, thin clients, all-in-ones, notebooks and tablets, monitors including CRTs, servers and storage arrays, switches and routers
  • Mobile phones
  • Printers, copiers and multi-function printers
  • POS equipment
  • Small kitchen, bathroom and laundry appliances: toasters, kettles, hairdryers, shavers and irons
  • Power drills, fans, vacuums and sound systems

For more information on Council’s waste and recycling centres, visit the redlnd.cc/e-waste.

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Recycled tyres drive change at Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre


An innovative tyre recycling program is driving change at Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre.

Council is working with road construction company RPQ Group to use crumbed rubber blended bitumen to resurface a 22,000sq m upper level section of the recycling and waste centre.

Mayor Karen Williams said the upgrade works would repurpose 550 used tyres.

“We know our approach to waste management makes a difference to our local community, our region and the world around us,” she said.

“Our choices impact quality of life for the 157,000 residents who call Redlands Coast home, as well as future generations.

“The more we can recycle, reuse and recover, the less waste needs to go to landfill.”

Cr Williams said RPQ Group was working with local governments to support the recycling industry and utilise their products in construction projects.

“Council engages a tyre recycling contractor but Australia does currently generate 56 million used tyres every year,” Cr Williams said.

“In 2019-2020 RPQ Group sprayed 18 million litres of crumbed rubber throughout Queensland and NSW, recycling the equivalent of about 280,000 tyres.

“Crumbed rubber blended bitumen is becoming a preferred treatment for environmentally conscious councils, ensuring a viable and ongoing market for recycled tyre products.”

Cr Williams said that each year, on average, Council sent 135 tonnes of tyres received at its recycling and waste centres to a recycling facility – with none being sent to landfill.

“Once shredded, the crumbed rubber is used for construction projects, infill in synthetic grass and playground matting and, equestrian products,” Cr Williams said.

“Powdered recycled tyres are used in glue for the building industry while larger chips are also used by sporting clubs as bullet stop in their shooting range.”

Cr Williams said the Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre project was a practical example of Council supporting the circular economy, the recycling industry and local business.

Division 8 Councillor Tracey Huges said the resurfacing at Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre would upgrade the drop-off area for green waste, scrap metal, timber, tyres, bricks and concrete, asbestos/cement sheeting, fridges/air conditioning, clean soil, e-waste, car batteries and LPG bottles.

“Transfer stations are no longer just about dumping waste, they are where innovation in recycling and alternative uses are trialled and I am pleased the Birkdale facility is at the heart of that innovation,” Cr Huges said.

She said the centre was currently closed while the upgrades and site maintenance was being carried out, but it was scheduled to reopen on August 17.

“I appreciate the community’s patience and understanding while these vital works are completed.”

Cr Huges reminded residents to either hold onto waste and recyclables or make use of the Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre while the Birkdale facility was closed, with commercial operators being asked to use alternative facilities during this period.

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Young koalas stepping out into the world


A new generation of Redlands Coast koalas is stepping out into the world with the annual dispersal of young that precedes koala breeding season each year.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said residents and motorists should be on the lookout for smaller koalas, which were likely to pop up in the most unexpected spots.

“Often mistaken for lost joeys, these young koalas are usually about 18 months old and leaving their mothers’ territories is search of their own,” Cr Williams said.

A youngster recently spotted at Cleveland State School.

“As they make their way in the world, they will travel through bushland, backyards and across roads; exploring the terrain on foot and using all sorts of trees, not just Eucalypts.”

“To help young koalas travel safely, I encourage residents to keep their distance and confine or restrain their dogs at night; and motorists are urged to slow down and be alert for koala movement.”

How you can help young dispersing koalas:
• Let them continue on their way without interference, as your “help” can confuse them and lead to unexpected danger.
• Keep your distance and confine or restrain you dogs at night to allow safe movement.
• Make your backyard more koala friendly by putting a wooden pole or ladder against your fence so they can continue on through and a floating water aid in your pool so they can climb out if they fall in.
• When driving, slow down and be alert to wildlife movement from road sides.
• If you are worried about the health or welfare of any koala phone the Redlands 24-hour Wildlife Rescue Service on 3833 4031.

For more information on our local koalas, including how to spot a sick or injured koala, visit Council’s koala webpage

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Council venues reopening as COVID-19 restrictions ease


Redland Art Gallery (RAG), Cleveland and IndigiScapes are all set to reopen to the public on Monday 15 June, with RecycleWorld following the next day.

Mayor Karen Williams said she was delighted that more Council venues would soon be ready to receive visitors in line with Stage 2 of the Queensland Government’s Roadmap to Easing COVID-19 Restrictions.

“While some of our Council venues were able to quickly reopen after the Stage 2 easing of restrictions was brought forward, others are still gearing up to reopen to our community as safely as possible,” Cr Williams said.

“We welcomed the State Government’s decision to bring forward Stage 2, but the lack of notice has meant some slight delays.”

Councillor Williams said art gallery visitors were in for a treat with a revised program of exhibitions being released for the rest of this calendar year.

“Two new exhibitions will run in the Cleveland Gallery from 15 June until 2 August,” she said.

Redland Art Awards: Works acquired 2006-2018 will highlight 14 wonderful artworks held in the RAG Collections acquired from the gallery’s prestigious biennial contemporary painting competition.

Breathing Space is a selection of RAG Collection works that encourage us to stop, relax and reconnect with Redlands Coast on Quandamooka Country.”

Image: Julie Reeves, Dark garden 4 2007, oil on canvas. Redland Art Gallery Collection. Donated through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program by Julie Reeves, 2012. Courtesy of the artist. Photography by Carl Warner.

Council venues – reopening dates and conditions

Redland Art Gallery (RAG), Cleveland will reopen on Monday 15 June with two exhibitions:
• Redland Art Awards: Works acquired 2006-2018
• Breathing Space: Taking time out with the RAG Collection

Conditions in place:
• As a maximum of 20 people is currently permitted, gallery employees will regulate visitor entry.
• There will be no public seating available.
• You can now view exhibitions at the Cleveland gallery in person, with children’s art and craft still activities available online at http://artgallery.redland.qld.gov.au

Redlands IndigiScapes Centre will reopen on Monday 15 June.

The Discovery Centre, gift shop, nursery and café will all reopen, with the flow of visitors being regulated to ensure compliance with social distancing rules.

• Centre opening (including gift shop) hours: 10am – 4pm daily
• Nursery opening hours: 10am – 3pm weekdays
• Café opening hours: three set seating times with modified menu for dining in (bookings essential, limited take-away options will be available):

  • Morning tea: 10am –11.30am
  • Lunch:  12pm -1.30pm
  • Afternoon tea: 2pm – 3pm

Discovery Centre opening hours: three sessions daily, aligned with café seating times.

Phone 3824 8611 for café bookings.

RecycleWorld at Redland Bay Recycle and Waste Centre will reopen on Tuesday 16 June.

Opening hours: Tuesdays and Fridays (instead of Saturdays), 10am – 2pm
• 10am – 12 noon: pedestrian entry only through the loading bay gate. Purchases (other than large items) will need to be carried out by customers via the pedestrian footpath.
• 12 noon – 2pm: vehicle pick up of large items from the loading bay.

Conditions in place:
• Entry will be regulated due to current gathering rules. Visitors can expect queues on entry and payment.
• If the carpark is full, customers may be asked to return later.
• Payment via EFT only.
• Footwear must be worn (this is an existing safety measure).
For full list of conditions: https://www.redland.qld.gov.au/info/20189/waste_transfer_stations/334/recycleworld

All Council venues

• Council venues being reopened will provide safe and welcoming spaces for the Redlands Coast community and visitors.
• Cleaning will be increased, sanitiser will be available and social distancing measures will be in place.
• Conditions at all venues will be reviewed again when Queensland reaches Stage 3 in the easing of restrictions roadmap.

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Council seeks community input on coastal strategy


Redland City Council is inviting community members to provide input into Phase 6 of its Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy.

A city-wide strategy for the protection of the city’s coastline, including islands and inland rivers and creeks; the project will assess the vulnerability of infrastructure, assets and property to coastal hazards, and recommend actions to help adapt and manage these risks.

As part of the project’s next phase, Council is conducting an online survey seeking feedback from community members on what they value most about Redlands Coast, plus their understanding and any experiences of coastal hazards.

Mayor Karen Williams, who is also chairperson of the project’s steering committee, said the next phase involved identifying options that would help Redlands Coast adapt to, and be protected from, potential hazards such as coastal erosion, storm tide inundation, and sea level rise to the years 2070 and 2100.

“I’m very proud of this project and I’m looking forward to its completion later this year,” Cr Williams said.

“Council and project stakeholders have worked hard in developing the Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy, and this next phase calls for the community to provide invaluable input to help inform the strategy’s recommended actions.

“Redlands Coast residents should feel confident knowing Council will have a plan in place to help protect our coastal lifestyle, Indigenous cultural heritage, and to guide the adaptation of private property and public infrastructure.”

Development of the strategy is overseen by the project’s steering committee, and is developed in consultation with the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation, key asset owners and stakeholder bodies, and the wider Redlands Coast community.

For more information about the strategy and to take the online survey, please visit the project page at yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/CHAS

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Enjoy safely all that Redlands Coast has to offer


There’s a lot to do at Redlands Coast as restrictions ease and we head into the cooler months that are perfect for hiking, cycling and exploring.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said that with people able to travel up to 150km from tomorrow, Saturday 16 May 2020, there were  many naturally wonderful hidden treasures and little adventures to explore on Redlands Coast.

“Please remember to exercise social distancing and buy local where you can,” Cr Williams said.

So what will it be for you this weekend?

Redlands Coast has everything from hiking in the bush at Venman Bushland National Park at Mt Cotton, to the all-abilities playground at Capalaba Regional Park to the King Island walk at Wellington Point Recreation Reserve.

Mountain bikers can get an adrenalin rush on the tracks at Redlands Track Park at Cleveland while all cyclists can enjoy the Moreton Bay Cycleway from Thorneside through Wellington Point and Cleveland to Victoria Point and Redland Bay.

You can also get out on our waterways kayaking, windsurfing, paddle boarding or boating, with restrictions removed from Saturday 16 May 2020 for boating around North Stradbroke Island.

All Redlands Coast Islands are also open for day trippers, with restrictions on North Stradbroke Island lifted on Saturday 16 May 2020.

Venman Bushland National Park

West Mount Cotton Road, Mount Cotton (Jungalpin/Tungipin)

Within the beautiful hinterland of Mount Cotton you’ll discover this reserve, with a variety of walking tracks amongst the forest of eucalypt and melaleuca trees. You may even be lucky and spot a koala so keep an eye out! The reserve also acts as a haven for many other native animals including greater gliders, powerful owls and red-necked wallabies, so it is the perfect place to explore.

Raby Bay Foreshore Park

Masthead Drive, Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie)

Raby Bay Foreshore Park boasts sprawling parklands with sandy beaches, a playground and scenic walking and bike paths. It’s a great place to take the family to cool off, enjoy a picnic and relax overlooking the bay. The calm waters are suitable for swimming and you can hire a kayak or stand-up paddle board right on the shore. Coffee, drinks and snacks are available from the coffee trailer. Don’t forget your furry friends. The park is dog-friendly, with a popular designated off-leash beach area.

Wellington Point Recreation Reserve

Main Road, Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen)

Wind surfing, stand up paddle boarding, kayaking, boating and coastal fishing are just some of the water activities that entice people from far and wide to the Wellington Point peninsula.

Surrounded by coast on three sides, Wellington Point Reserve is popular for picnics, launching a boat into Moreton Bay, and, at low tide, walking to King Island – home to an abundance of coastal wildlife.

Scattered with historic Moreton Bay Fig Trees, with a sandy beach, wooden jetty and brilliants, it is an Instagrammers delight.

Children love the established playgrounds that weave among the shade of Moreton Bay fig trees while the adjacent café and takeaway store offers a great menu and superb view.

King Island Walk

Main Road, Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen)

‘Walking on water’ across the spectacular low-tide sand bridge from Wellington Point to King Island is a Redlands Coast signature experience and one of the most unique walks in South-east Queensland.

A stunning sand causeway emerges from beneath the Moreton Bay waters between the Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen) mainland and the tiny, uninhabited King Island at low-tide, forming a natural bridge for walkers.

It’s a 2km return walk – great for kids who can paddle along the way and spot birds and crabs and you can take your dog (on leash) on week days too.

Make sure you check tide times before you head out too – it’s a strictly low-tide affair.

Put this one on your weekend bucket list for some time soon!

Cleveland Point Recreation Reserve

Shore St West, Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie)

With magnificent Moreton Bay on three sides, Cleveland Point is one of the most iconic, must-visit sites on Redlands Coast.

Cleveland Point is family-friendly with a park, children’s playground, shaded picnic areas and toilets, plus a picturesque pathway around the point for leisurely strolls and cycles – it has a significant link to the city’s past too with the historic Cleveland Point Lighthouse, a Redlands Coast and South-east Queensland icon.

There are plenty of reasons to stop and stay a while at the Cleveland Point Reserve too. Aside from the picturesque location and mesmerising views, the fish and chippery serves up great seafood.

Moreton Bay Cycleway

Redlands Coast

Start at Thorneside or at the other end at Redland Bay and cycle through Redlands Coast’s naturally wonderful villages taking in taking in the unique coastline and mangrove vegetation.

Redlands Track Park

Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie) and Alexandra Hills

Looking to discover a new coast this weekend? You can in Redlands Coast. The Redlands Track Park is a multi-use trail for mountain biking, walking and cycling. You may even spot a wallaby or two in the Scribbly Gum Conservation area. Add some excitement to your day by exploring the Scorpion Rock, the Hammer, and the Upper and Lower Magic trails.

IndigiScapes Centre

Runnymede Road, Capalaba (Kapallaba)

Immerse yourself in nature at Redlands Coast’s environmental education centre. Whilst the IndigiScapes building and café might be closed, you can still make the most of the tracks and trails that wind their way through the native bushland that surrounds the centre. Wander the paths that lead you through unspoilt greenery and follow the banks of Coolnwynpin Creek, or stroll the native botanical gardens and get inspiration for your own backyard. There is plenty of space for you to you pull up a picnic, and a playground for those looking to burn some energy! Keep an eye out for the local wildlife that like to call the area home – if you’re lucky you might spot swamp wallabies, lizards and an array of native birds.

For more places to discover on Redlands Coast visit visitredlandscoast.com.au.

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Stay safe as COVID-19 restrictions ease


With some COVID-19 restrictions being relaxed by the State Government this weekend, Redland City Mayor Karen Williams has urged Redlands Coast residents to continue to keep their distance and adhere to the rules still in place.

“I sincerely thank Redlands Coast residents for really stepping up and following the restrictions we’ve all been living under,” Cr Williams said.

“There’s no doubt that our collective efforts have helped to stop the spread of COVID-19 in our community.

“While it will be wonderful to be able to get out a bit more, the COVID-19 pandemic is far from over and we cannot risk undoing all our good work and putting our families, our colleagues, our community and ourselves at risk.

Under the new State Government directive, from tomorrow Saturday 2 May, in addition to your outdoor exercise, you’ll be able to:

  •  Travel within 50 kilometres of your home
  • Have a picnic in a park
  • Sit on a park bench and enjoy your lunch or a coffee
  • Have a driving lesson with a member of your household
  • Go on a motorbike ride or boat trip
  • Go shopping for non-essential items.

Despite the new State Government directions, Cr Williams asked residents to remember that the current gathering and social distancing rules still apply.

“In Redlands Coast, our barbecues, exercise equipment, playground equipment, table and chair sets and fully fenced dog off leash areas continue to be closed for the safety of the community.

Our unfenced or partially fenced dog offleash areas remain open.

“So if you are planning a picnic, bring a picnic rug or chairs or sit on one of our park bench seats.”

“Our Council-owned tennis courts will be re-open to the public this Saturday, with the gates “locked open” so people don’t have to touch them.”

Cr Williams said North Stradbroke Island was still a no-go for visitors.

“The Queensland Government’s travel ban specific to North Stradbroke Island remains in place, meaning travel, including by private boats, continues to be strictly prohibited except for permanent Straddie residents and those undertaking essential travel to and from the island,” She said.

“Non-essential travel includes holidays (even if you own a holiday home), recreation, tourism and general socialising with friends and family.

“Anyone travelling to Straddie still needs to show their ID.

“The 100 metre marine exclusion zone for the waters around North Stradbroke Island is still in place and recreational boats will be moved on by authorities.

“While there is no travel ban for our other islands I urge everyone to use common sense; it would be disappointing to see large crowds heading to our islands and potentially dangerous.

“Now is not the time for island hopping, please be respectful of those vulnerable residents on these islands.”

Further information: Council’s website redland.qld.gov.au/COVID19

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Use of fire pits on Redlands Coast


On Redlands Coast fire pits are allowed as long precautions are taken to prevent the spread of fire. This means the fire pit:

  • Cannot exceed 2m in width or length
  • Must be enclosed to prevent the escape of fire or any burning material
  • Must not cause a smoke nuisance, and
  • Is lit outdoors for the purpose of cooking or warmth

For more information: Council’s Smoke Nuisance Factsheet for Open Air Fires http://www.redland.qld.gov.au/download/downloads/id/2026/smoke_nuisance_%E2%80%93_open_air_fires.pdf

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