Category Archives: Planning

Council committed to improving access provisions for Kinross community


Redland City Council will advocate to the State Government for a public transport corridor and bus service at the Kinross Road Structure Plan (KRSP) area.

Deputy Mayor Julie Talty said a Ministerial condition requiring the transport corridor was placed on the structure plan area in 2011.

“The provision of this corridor continues to remain the responsibility of the State Government through TransLink,” Cr Talty said.

“Unfortunately, TransLink has not indicated intention to provide the corridor or a bus service, but Council will advocate to the State Government to ascertain when this public transport link will be constructed, operational, and providing this much needed service to the Kinross community.”

This week’s Council report followed a Notice of Motion from Division 7 Councillor Rowanne McKenzie to investigate better access for residents.

“As part of a longer term strategy, Council will also review the potential for a further road connection for the Kinross community,” Cr McKenzie said.

“This will include in the first instance determining whether there is a need for a further road connection, with investigations to commence in 2021 as part of the next Local Government Infrastructure Plan review.

“The KRSP area is continuing to grow, and Council has conducted extensive investigations in the past into alternative access points.

“Council will continue to advocate to the State Government and investigate options to provide better access to serve this expanding community.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Have your say on the future of Redlands Coast


Redland City Council is inviting feedback on its new draft corporate plan: Our Future Redlands – A Corporate Plan to 2026 and Beyond.  

Mayor Karen Williams said all local governments in Queensland were required to produce a new corporate plan every five years, with the strategic document providing councils with clear direction for decision-making on matters such as budget and resource prioritisation.

“Our draft corporate plan outlines Redland City Council’s priorities for the next five years,” Cr Williams said.

“Unlike previous corporate plans, the draft Our Future Redlands also sets a long-term vision and goals to 2041.

“The new draft plan has been informed by what our community has told us is important.”

Cr Williams said analysis of community feedback from strategic planning and policy programs from 2010 to 2019 identified community views and values, while consultation with divisional Councillors ensured community needs were addressed.

“This analysis and consultation highlighted that many of the community’s views have remained constant over recent years, and Council remains committed to delivering a corporate plan that provides clear direction for decisions about the natural environment, strong communities, a thriving economy, city leadership, and Council as an effective and efficient organisation,” she said.

“Liveable neighbourhoods is also included as a strategic goal as Councillors and the community all prioritised city and transport planning as key focus areas.”

Cr Williams said that in addition to goals and the 20-year vision for Redlands Coast, the draft corporate plan also outlined key initiatives and catalyst projects.

“We have a draft corporate plan and now we want to hear from the community on whether we have it right, with the final plan to include revisions based on what we hear back from the community,” she said.

“I urge everyone to read the information available and have their say on the future of Redlands Coast before consultation closes on 11 November 2020.

“The easiest way to do this is to visit Council’s Your Say site for a copy of the plan and other information, including an online survey that can be completed.

“Additionally, Council is encouraging individuals, families and community groups to hold a DIY Conversation using the step-by-step guide that can also be downloaded from the Your Say site or collected from one of our Customer Service Centres.”

The new corporate plan will supersede the 10-year-old Redlands 2030 Community Plan.

For more information and to provide your feedback on the draft Our Future Redlands – A Corporate Plan to 2026 and Beyond, visit Council’s yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au and be in the draw to win one of five $100 gift cards.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Have a say on future Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area land uses


Redland City Council is supporting the local jobs of tomorrow by prioritising economic development in the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area, with residents now invited to have their say.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council had focussed on jobs creation as part of a planning investigation for the area after Council had been directed by the State Government to consider the potential future growth area.

“This land has been the subject of almost 20 years of planning and community debate, disrupted by changing directions,” she said.

“The State Government previously included part of the area in the urban footprint, which would have seen the area used for residential development.

“But this decision was then reversed, with the State Government then nominating it as a Potential Future Growth Area and directing Council to undertake planning investigations to determine the preferred future use of the area.

“Council has been firm that this area should be used for jobs, not small lot housing and so we have developed a plan to reflect this commitment.

“The proposals include areas for mixed industry and business, intensive horticulture, education, training and recreation, a transport precinct, storage and larger home-based industry enterprise activities,” she said.

Cr Williams said Council had also drawn a line in the sand by clearly stating that land not used for economic uses should only be used for larger rural living blocks (i.e., with a minimum lot size of 1 hectare) and not small lot housing.

“Given this area has seen a number of uses suggested over the years, Council wanted to make it clear that we do not support small lot housing and will only support rural living, which fits with the character of the area while also addressing homebuyer demand for this sort of rural product.”

Cr Williams said Council had also resolved to consult the whole community on the proposed use of the area at the same time the proposed plan was sent to the Minister.

“The Minister wrote to Council asking us to engage with landowners in the plan area, but Council believes this land is strategically important for the entire city and given we are focussing on job creation in the area we felt everyone should have the opportunity to have a say,” Cr Williams said.

“As such we have today opened engagement and are inviting the community to provide feedback. The views of the community will be used to inform a potential future amendment to City Plan.

“There has been a lot of debate and history to these land use recommendations, and Council wants to hear the community’s feedback on the proposed balance of future economic and residential use of the land.”

For more information about the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area, and to have your say on the draft proposals for preferred future land uses, visit the project’s page on Council’s Your Say site.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Council supports Covid-19 urban planning flexibility – not unintended legacies.


Redland City Council will not opt into state government Covid-19 planning regulation changes, for now, saying the Redland City Plan already aligns well with the majority of proposed changes.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council fully supports the need to facilitate flexible support for businesses, jobs and economic growth in response to impacts of Covid-19.

“Responses to Covid-19 need to help support business innovation, improved processes and help them to adapt and invest for long term futures.

“Good planning will facilitate this, and the Redland City Plan already aligns well the majority of changes proposed by the State.

“Where it doesn’t, it has been a deliberate decision to encourage appropriate planning uses and outcomes.

“Some of the Covid-19 planning concessions proposed by the State may well result in permanent unintended planning outcomes for the city,” Cr Karen Williams said.

“Examples include allowing specific non-industrial uses to establish in existing tenancies in industrial zones without the need for planning approval or expanding gross floor area of specific existing uses by up to 10 per cent or 100m2.

“Expanding floor areas without assessing the impacts may end up permanently reducing the number of parking spaces provided, thus affecting adjoining businesses, or impact site landscaping. 

“Proposed changes in uses allowed in an industrial zone that do not need to locate in these areas, will reduce suitable land set aside for future industry.

“Councils submission to the State will acknowledge minor and helpful changes while calling for more detail on some parts of the proposed changes.

“Council has received positive responses to date to its COVID-19 Business Support Grant and Innovation grants for Redlands Coast businesses. 

 “We will continue to work closely with business and new investors to the Redlands Coast to make sure there are no unnecessary impediments, including through city planning.

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Council seeks community input on coastal strategy


Redland City Council is inviting community members to provide input into Phase 6 of its Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy.

A city-wide strategy for the protection of the city’s coastline, including islands and inland rivers and creeks; the project will assess the vulnerability of infrastructure, assets and property to coastal hazards, and recommend actions to help adapt and manage these risks.

As part of the project’s next phase, Council is conducting an online survey seeking feedback from community members on what they value most about Redlands Coast, plus their understanding and any experiences of coastal hazards.

Mayor Karen Williams, who is also chairperson of the project’s steering committee, said the next phase involved identifying options that would help Redlands Coast adapt to, and be protected from, potential hazards such as coastal erosion, storm tide inundation, and sea level rise to the years 2070 and 2100.

“I’m very proud of this project and I’m looking forward to its completion later this year,” Cr Williams said.

“Council and project stakeholders have worked hard in developing the Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy, and this next phase calls for the community to provide invaluable input to help inform the strategy’s recommended actions.

“Redlands Coast residents should feel confident knowing Council will have a plan in place to help protect our coastal lifestyle, Indigenous cultural heritage, and to guide the adaptation of private property and public infrastructure.”

Development of the strategy is overseen by the project’s steering committee, and is developed in consultation with the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation, key asset owners and stakeholder bodies, and the wider Redlands Coast community.

For more information about the strategy and to take the online survey, please visit the project page at yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/CHAS

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

$8.1mill School of Arts Road, Redland Bay roadwork completed as more work planned


An $8.1 million section of roadwork on School of Arts Road and Collins Street Redland Bay has been completed ahead of schedule and under budget, paving the way for Council to start upgrading nearby water infrastructure in the New Year.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said it may be hard to appreciate the significance of the completed road work for those not familiar with how this section of road used to be.

“This new road section completed by Council crews has won compliments from locals for the way the work was undertaken and has fixed major floodway problems over Weinam creek.

“The finished roadwork has been lifted a metre above the old floodway that has been a source of regular flooding and traffic disruption during wet conditions.

“The design of the new work has also avoided impacts on a corner property and much loved fig tree that is a locally recognised landmark visible from the surrounding areas.

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said the surface of the new two lane road section provides a smoother, quieter and longer lasting surface that will reduce ongoing maintenance costs and improve road access for an urban area of the city that has grown rapidly over recent years.

“The new road section includes cycle lanes, parking and safe pedestrian islands for crossings to popular nearby community facilities, while also ensuring that major utility service trenching upgrades were undertaken during construction,” Cr Edwards said.

Division 6 Councillor Julie Talty said improvements to local infrastructure would continue with Council beginning work on new sewer infrastructure along an adjoining section of School of Arts Road in January.

“The planned works from Denham Boulevard to approximately 60 meters past the Cypress and Bedarra Streets Roundabout will involve the supply and installation of a major new rising sewer main, a small section of gravity sewer main, manholes and other work.

“Traffic detours will be necessary during work hours from 7.00am and 6.00pm Monday to Friday for all west bound traffic travelling between Denham Boulevard and Cypress Street but detours will not apply outside of these work hours.

“Site works will begin on 6 January with the work planned for completion in April 2020, weather permitting.

“Council greatly appreciates the ongoing patience and co-operation of road users and the local community and for helping to ensure these important infrastructure project can be completed safely, on budget and on-time.”

Information on the new sewer project is available on the Yoursay Redlands Coast website or by contacting council on Tel 3829 8999.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Bring out your stories about Birkdale land


Redland City Council has put out the call for residents to share any historic or cultural information they may have about land at Birkdale which has now been purchased by Council from the Commonwealth Government.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council was inviting personal stories about the 61 hectares of land at 362-388 Old Cleveland Road East, Birkdale while a suite of additional heritage, environment and land studies were carried out.

“To support the work of the experts who will be completing gap analysis and further information gathering, Council is inviting the community to also share their knowledge of the land, its history and values.

“This is the first stage of speaking with the community about this property, with formal public consultation to occur next year after all heritage and environmental studies have been completed.

“The Redlands Coast community has had a long and strong relationship and interest in the Birkdale site over many decades, including its Quandamooka cultural significance and historic role in World War II.

“While much is already known about the land, a great deal of its history is locked in the memories and experiences of residents, with many having childhood stories of the land and the creek.

Cr Williams said that securing the property had been a long journey across a number of years and many Federal Government Ministers.

“We have been trying to secure this land for years and for it to now be owned by the community is exciting news,” she said.

“We want to thank the Federal Government for agreeing to sell the land to the Redlands Coast community so its significance will be protected and the land can be retained for community benefit.

Federal Member for Bowman, Mr Andrew Laming MP said the transfer of ownership was a project he initiated with then Mayor Don Seccombe shortly after being elected in 2005.

“It took 5270 days and navigating dozens of Ministers and advisors but we got there. The greatest victory being a sale to Redland City Council rather than into private hands which the law would usually require. There isn’t a deal like this anywhere nationwide.

“Council has been a model purchaser and tolerated plenty of ups and downs from Canberra, including last year’s federal Budget which incorrectly listed the purpose of sale for development.”

Cr Williams said over seventy two percent of the 61.78 hectare site is already principally zoned conservation within the City Plan, with the remaining 17 hectares of the site zoned for community purpose.

“This land purchase is a major and strategic opportunity to secure a lasting legacy for future Redlands Coast generations.

“This includes the opportunity for community recreation, sport and tourism uses on the small portion of the site that is zoned for community purposes.

“Council’s commitment today is to ensure that the future for the land is part of well-informed conversation with the Redlands Coast community.”

Visit the Your Say Redlands Coast Birkdale Land page on to tell your story.
 

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Trail creates new southern Russell Island evacuation route


 Works have begun this week on hardening a trail along Lagoon Road, Russell Island to create an alternate evacuation route on the southern end of the island.

Redland City Mayor and Chair of the Local Disaster Management Group Karen Williams said the works to the existing fire trail would ensure it could be used as an evacuation route if needed.

“The works to the 300m trail, along Lagoon Road, will involve adding rocks and gravel to harden and widen it to 2.5m to improve accessibility,” Cr William said.

“It is not designed to be a new road, but once upgraded the trail can be opened to access by emergency agencies and resident evacuation should the need arise.

“The trail work, expected to be complete by early December, is the latest in our emergency planning on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands and will provide an added evacuation option, linking Rocky Point to Centre Road.

“This adds to our other 2019 fire preparedness efforts across the Southern Moreton Bay Islands, including clearing reduction zones, slashing blocks, controlled burns, community education campaigns and new signage.”

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said the works, were a timely reminder for people to also take their own precautions.

“Council continues significant disaster preparation works, and to collaborate with other levels of government, to ensure we are ready of the storm and bushfire season ahead of us,” Cr Edwards said.

“As residents we all need to be part of that collaboration, and take household measures to ensure the safety of our loved ones and assets.

“It is important that all residents, but particularly islanders who have the added complexity of geographic isolation, take the time now to prepare their homes and set up an emergency kit and plan.

“Knowing evacuation routes in advance, such as the additional one we are creating now along Lagoon Rd, could make all the difference in an emergency situation.

“I encourage everyone to jump on to Council’s dedicated Disaster Dashboard disaster.redland.qld.gov.au for details on how to be prepared for what could be testing season ahead.”

Tips for helping to fireproof your property include:

  • keeping grass and undergrowth trimmed
  • raking up and reduce leaf litter and overgrown shrubs
  • removing branches overhanging buildings and leaf litter from roofs and gutters
  • storing fuels and chemicals away from dwellings
  • moving woodpiles away from buildings
  • preventing embers from entering a building by sealing gaps, vents and roof spaces
  • displaying house numbers clearly and provide access for fire trucks.

Recent fire mitigation work across the SMBI’s includes:

  • six prescribed burns completed on Russell Island 2019
  • six prescribed burns completed on Macleay Island in 2019
  • 300  (212313 m2) blocks slashed
  • 544  (122,794 m2) fuel reduction areas slashed
  • 23 (8km) new fire trails constructed on Russell Island
  • Design work underway to consider forming Glendale Rd from Rocky Point to Sandy Beach
  • Consideration of a secondary evacuation route north of Sandy Beach Rd
  • Fire Danger Rating signs across each island
  • Emergency signage placed on SBMI and Coochiemudlo Islands
  • Fire preparedness information distributed at mainland ferry terminals
  • Posters and information flyers available at ferry terminals
  • Community Champions have been readied to provide fire preparedness information to the community at SMBI ferry terminals or operate Evacuation Centres if needed.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Moreton Bay Cycleway extension opens


This week marked a high point for Redlands Coast cyclists and recreational trail users, with the completion of Stage 1 of a multi-million dollar extension to Moreton Bay Cycleway.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Stage 1 was part of a multi-stage cycleway extension jointly funded by Council and the Queensland Government, due for completion by mid-2020.

“Today’s opening of Stage 1 of the Moreton Bay Cycleway Extension Project sees an additional 850m of pathways and boardwalk added to this much-loved community asset,” Cr Williams said.

“A 3m wide cycleway now links to existing networks at Cameron Court Park and School Road, Victoria Point.

“Section 2 works, providing a link from School Road through Orana Street Park to Lakefield Drive, will start soon and include a further 350m of boardwalk and 360m concrete footpath, or a total extension of 710m.

“Section 3 is the final link of the network and will see an on-road link via Lakefield Drive and we hope to have the entire project completed and open for public use by mid-2020.

“This newly-opened section, and the stages to follow soon, will provide important linkages between existing bike paths and will greatly improve usability, accessibility and overall visitor experience.”

The $1.83 million Moreton Bay Cycleway Section 1 project is funded equally by Council and State through their 2018-19 Cycle Network Local Government Grants Program.

Deputy Mayor and Division 4 Councillor Lance Hewlett said a trip along the newly-completed section of the cycleway offered a great recreational experience.

“We now have a new way for people to enjoy natural assets and connect across our City, with residents and visitors soon being able to pedal from Cleveland to Victoria Point along the Moreton Bay Cycleway,” Cr Hewlett said.

“There are some beautiful vantage points along the way, with the Stage 1 winding through Point Halloran Conservation Area.”

State Member for Redlands Kim Richards said Queensland State Government was delighted to partner with Council on this exciting project.

“We want to see people heading outdoors and enjoying recreational and health benefits, and State Government has been proud to support Council in delivering this cycleway,” Ms Richards said.

“Moreton Bay Cycleway provides high quality and safe cycling infrastructure and this project is an example of what can be achieved through collaboration.”

Mayor Karen Williams, Deputy Mayor and Division 4 Councillor Lance Hewlett and Member for Redlands Kim Richards join community members at stage 1 of the Moreton Bay Cycleway extension

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Redland City Council Annual Report tells of positive performance


Redland City Council today endorsed its Annual Report 2018 – 2019, highlighting positive financial and operational results and Council’s significant activities for the year.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the report showed Council’s continued financial sustainability and also outlined where the money goes, with a 100 per cent delivery of its Operational Plan 2018 – 2019.

“Each year, our Operational Plan sets significant activities to help us achieve our community commitments outlined in the Corporate Plan 2018 – 2023,” Cr Williams said.

“Today Council proudly presented an Annual Report that showed delivery of all 70 significant activities across our eight Vision Outcomes.

““Our Community Financial Report and externally-audited Consolidated Financial Statements present good news, with our current position providing stability for long-term financial strategies and meeting our future obligations.

Mayor Williams said the report also shared some business innovations that had resulted in significant operational cost savings in the 2018 – 2019 financial year.

“It is important that the Redlands Coast community has confidence in our performance in managing an asset portfolio with a replacement value of $3.7 billion on their behalf.

“Continuous improvement can be seen in action through Business Transformation Program case studies, with an additional $2 million of infrastructure delivered on top of our budgeted commitments.

“The annual report also includes some of the challenges faced in 2018 – 2019, to give our stakeholders and customers an understanding of current regional and local issues that impact Redlands Coast.

“There are also detailed sections providing transparency in reporting of our governance mechanisms and statutory disclosures.”

View the Redland City Council Annual Report 2018 – 2019 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email