Category Archives: Planning

Enough housing supply and diversity in Redland City


Redland City Councillors have unanimously refuted the Deputy Premier’s proposed Ministerial Direction requiring Council to prepare a new housing supply and diversity strategy for Redland City by August 2022.

Mayor Karen Williams said Redland City had plenty of housing supply and diversity and would demonstrate there was no urgent need for a strategy in a written submission to the Deputy Premier and Minister for State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning, Steven Miles.

“I am bewildered as to why the Deputy Premier has sent a letter stating he is considering using his ministerial powers to force Council’s hand on the matter,” Cr Williams said.

“We are meeting our requirements with evidence of sufficient and increasing housing diversity in Redlands in the State Government’s own annual Land Supply and Development Monitoring (LSDM) Reports.

“The LSDM consistently notes that Redland City has sufficient planned dwelling supply to achieve the dwelling supply benchmarks of the SEQ Regional Plan (ShapingSEQ).

“In addition, recent dwelling approvals show the City is achieving greater diversity in its dwelling stock compared with the 2016 Census.

“While housing strategies are valuable, local governments would usually undertake them in preparation for a review of their planning schemes.

“As this is some four years away for Redland City, and the city’s 2002/21 housing supply figures exceeds the State’s targets, it would be premature and unnecessary for Council to allocate resources to undertake this strategy now.

“Council has already completed two pieces of work that currently serve the purpose of a housing supply strategy – the Redlands Housing Strategy 2011-2031 and the Redland Land Supply Review; a detailed assessment of residential land availability undertaken in 2014,” Cr Williams said.

Prior to the preparation of the current Redland City Plan, Council officers engaged planning consultants to prepare the ‘Redlands Housing Strategy 2011-2031’ (RHS), which recommended the types of housing that would be required to meet the future housing needs of the Redlands.

In 2014 Council also engaged planning consultants to undertake a detailed assessment of residential land availability in the Redlands which found that Redland has capacity to accommodate the number of dwellings required to house the projected population growth over the planning timeframe 2014 to 2041.

Cr Williams said that together, these bodies of work not only informed the development of the Redland City Plan but would also ensure future planning scheme amendments and the review of the Local Government Infrastructure Plan supported ongoing supply and diversity of residential land across our City.

“Council is also currently finalising a comprehensive review of existing residential land supply and demand across the City to 2045,”Cr Williams said.

“While we may have temporarily fallen below the ShapingSEQ benchmark of four years of approved lot supply, our figures from the 2020/21 financial year will be well above this target at close to five years.

“We seem to have been singled out as there are much bigger players with a lot more population growth that could deliver additional housing, but do not seem to be getting the same direction from the Minister.

“It would appear that other local government areas that have fallen below the ShapingSEQ threshold – including Brisbane, Sunshine Coast, Gold Coast, Noosa and Moreton Bay – have not been requested to prepare a housing supply and diversity strategy.

“Council has also progressed land use and infrastructure planning for two newly emerging communities in south west Victoria Point and southern Redland Bay which are expected to accommodate more than 5500 new lots, including providing opportunities for lots below 400m2.

“It is also worth noting that the Deputy Premier recently commented that the State’s newly established Priority Growth Area in Southern Redland Bay would unlock growth, housing choice and affordability and identified the opportunity for an additional 2000 new dwellings outside the approved Shoreline development.

Council determined today that the CEO would write back to the Deputy Premier to demonstrate there was no need to prepare a housing supply and diversity strategy at this time, and request that the State provide a transport and infrastructure plan that is intrinsically linked to the dwelling forecasts for Redland City and that includes the Eastern Busway through to Capalaba, Cleveland Rail duplication through to Cleveland and upgrades to all State-owned roads.

Providing this critical infrastructure will be key in unlocking the planned dwelling supply in City’s existing urban areas.

Cr Williams said “We stand here ready to collaborate with the State Government but want to do it right.

“We ask the State to come to the party with transport and other infrastructure that meets growth expectations.”

Council has 20 business days to make a submission in response to the Deputy Premier’s notification that he was considering exercising the Ministerial Direction powers under the Planning Act 2016 to require Council to prepare a Redland City housing supply and diversity strategy by 30 August 2022.

 

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Redlands Coast closer to hosting Olympics events as Brisbane 2032 proposal firms


Redland City Mayor Karen Williams is pleased the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Executive has recommended Brisbane’s proposal be advanced to a full committee session vote expected ahead of the opening of the Games of the XXXII Olympiad in Tokyo on July 23.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced early this morning that it would progress Brisbane’s proposal to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games to a full vote and that Redlands Coast was set to be the location for the canoe (slalom) events if it was endorsed.

“A purpose-built Olympic-standard Redland Whitewater Centre is part of the integrated Redlands Coast Adventure Sports Precinct for which Birkdale Community Precinct on Old Cleveland Road East, Birkdale, is the preferred site,” Cr Williams said.

“The Olympic venue will be funded by both the Federal and State governments and would help support other attractions at the site, including Willards Farm and the WWII radio receiver station, both financially and through attraction of visitors.

“In April 2021, the Federal Government committed to a 50/50 funding arrangement with the Queensland Government for all venues and critical infrastructure associated with the potential 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

“What is so very exciting about this venue is that it will be a legacy facility for generations to come.

“It will also bring forward significant infrastructure, in particular, road, rail and bus projects for Redlands Coast.

“Our community is particularly keen to see the much-needed duplication of the Cleveland railway line and the completion of the Eastern Busway to Capalaba.

“Similar Olympic facilities elsewhere demonstrate substantial local economic benefits, including during construction and for ongoing operation.

“It is anticipated that about 150 jobs could be sustained through the building and delivery of the adventure sports precinct, with an annual contribution of $52 million to the local economy.

“It also has significant opportunities as a swift-water rescue training facility for emergency services.

“The whitewater centre will be part of a larger adventure sports precinct proposed to be integrated into Birkdale Community Precinct with its overall legacy opportunities being compelling.

“A whitewater facility featured strongly in the community’s list of preferred ideas for the Birkdale precinct during Council’s recent extensive community engagement campaign.

“At 62 hectares, Birkdale Community Precinct provides more than enough space to accommodate the Redlands Coast Adventure Sports Precinct and a variety of other uses in an integrated way.

“As well as strong support for the whitewater facility, the community told us they wanted picnic facilities, cycling and walking paths and circuits, access to Tingalpa Creek and natural areas, café and dining areas, community markets, camping and overnight stays, an amphitheatre and performance spaces, education and training facilities, paddock to plate, wildlife tourism and night walks.”

Cr Williams said the Council of Mayors (SEQ), which has been instrumental in the Brisbane 2032 proposal, is honoured the IOC Executive has recommended the proposal go to a full session vote.

“While we acknowledge this exciting milestone, there is still a lot of work to be done and all partners look forward to a final decision by the IOC and stand ready to assist in providing any further information,” Cr Williams said.

“The potential benefits of a Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games are massive – some $8.1 billion in economic and social benefits for Queensland, and $17.6 billion nationally.”

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Have your say on Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan


Redlands Coast residents can now have their say on Redland City Council’s four-year plan to boost recycling and reduce local waste going to landfill.

Council will open its draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 for four weeks of community consultation from 27 April.

Councillors have also endorsed in principle a longer term draft waste management plan developed by the SEQ Council of Mayors to guide a regional approach to waste management, which will be launched in May.

Mayor Karen Williams said all residents had a vested interest in how Council and its local government neighbours met waste reduction and recycling targets necessitated by significant changes in the waste sector in recent years.

“Better management of our waste and the greater uptake of recycling means more than just helping our environment and progressing to a zero-waste future, it is also critical to minimise extra costs to ratepayers,” Cr Williams said.

“In July 2019 the State Government introduced a waste levy in an attempt to reduce waste being sent to landfill.

“While this levy is currently subsidised by the State Government, we are concerned this subsidy may change in the future, making the investment into improved recycling a better use of community funds.

“Council’s draft plan, developed alongside the broader draft South-East Queensland Waste Management Plan, outlines how we can all work together to better use our existing kerbside waste, recycling and green waste services as efficiently as possible.

“Through it we will work to double the number of households with a green-waste bin for garden organics, as well as halve the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste bins.

“We also want to ensure everyone knows the importance of using the right bin and reduce the contamination in yellow-lid recycling bins that can undermine residents’ recycling efforts.

“Our aim is for 90 per cent of our community to be correctly recycling 90 per cent of their waste, 90 per cent of the time. This is what it will take to reach Queensland’s recycling target of 70 per cent by 2050, together with other industry action.”

Cr Williams said the draft plan relied on residents working with Council to reduce waste and increase recycling.

“The plan outlines a way we can collectively achieve waste reduction and recycling targets set by the Queensland Government,” she said.

“Community involvement is important to the success of the plan and achieving a collective impact on our waste management and a zero waste future for the Redlands Coast.

“Now that the consultation period has started, I encourage everyone to provide feedback on the priorities and initiatives identified in this draft plan.

“I know how passionate our community is about helping to look after our environment and keeping Redlands Coast naturally wonderful.

“So please take this opportunity to tell us what you think.”

Redland City Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 includes encouraging the improved use of the existing kerbside services such as:

  1. doubling the number of households with a green waste bin for garden organics
  2. halving the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste bins
  3. reducing contamination (non-recyclable materials) in the yellow-lid recycling
  4. ensuring everyone knows the importance of using the right bin.

Currently almost two-thirds of what goes in Redlands Coast red-lid waste bins could be kept out of landfill, including more than 10,000 tonnes a year of garden organics and 6,000 tonnes of other waste which could be recycled.

Visit Council’s Your Say website https://yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/  to read all about the draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 and have your say by 28 May 2021. As an added incentive, those who complete the online survey will have the chance to enter a competition draw to win one of 10 x$50 IndigiScapes vouchers (terms and conditions apply).

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EOI to steer Weinam Creek car-share scheme at Redland Bay Marina


Plans to establish a long-term car-share scheme at Redland Bay Marina, Weinam Creek, are pushing ahead.

At today’s general meeting, Redland City Council resolved to support an Expression of Interest and subsequent tender process for the scheme.

Mayor Karen Williams said the move followed the conclusion of a car-share trial conducted at the marina from August 2020 to April 2021.

“An existing local car-share operator provided the service and Council officers monitored the progress to determine if a permanent scheme was viable,” Cr Williams said.

“Assessment criteria included general community feedback as well as car-share vehicle usage and trial enforcement.

“Over the course of the trial, local community feedback was generally supportive and the operator reported a consistent increase in usage and registrations as a result of having dedicated car parks in close proximity to the ferry terminal. “

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said Council would seek applications that proposed a suitable number of spaces, site location close to Redland Bay Marina and ways to ensure parking compliance at the proposed site.

“One of the issues to emerge during the trial was parking enforcement and ensuring there were enough spaces for car-share vehicles only,” Cr Edwards said.

“As a result, Council will be requesting proposals that include ways to ensure exclusive use of the spaces, and that may be via a lease, licence or permit arrangement.

“It is proposed that the car-share scheme operate for approximately two years.”

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Green light to support plan for age-friendly community


A five-year action plan to make the Redlands Coast a truly age-friendly community has been given the green light by Redland City Council.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council had today adopted the Redlands Coast Age-friendly Action Plan 2021-2026.

“Like many other communities, Redlands Coast has an ageing population,” Cr Williams said.

“This plan provides a way forward for Council, the community and government to work together to ensure that ageing on the Redlands Coast can be a positive experience where people of all ages can live active fulfilling lives, participating in all aspects of the community.

“It recognises the potential and the value of our older residents’ ongoing contribution to creating a vibrant community.”

Areas identified for action include:

* Outdoor spaces and buildings
* Transport
* Housing
* Social participation
* Respect and social inclusion
* Civic participation and employment
* Communication and information
* Community support and health services

Cr Williams said the Redlands Coast plan was based on the World Health Organisation’s age-friendly cities model which focused on reducing barriers in the physical and social environments so people could remain active and independent for as long as possible.

“This is a plan for our senior citizens, most importantly with valuable input from local seniors and seniors’ organisations,” she said.

“This has helped shape a path that is a true reflection of the needs of our community.

“For example, one of the focus areas will be options for ageing in place on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands.

“Other areas identified for action include improving community transport solutions, building resilient communities, developing research partnerships and intergenerational programs and establishing an age-friendly ambassadors program.”

The plan can be found on the Your Say website.

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Redland City advocates for new Redland Bay precinct


Redland City Council is advocating to the state and federal governments for their continued support of Redland Bay’s Weinam Creek precinct as a coastal village of regional and intergenerational importance.

At its general meeting today, councillors also endorsed the updated Weinam Creek Priority Development Area (PDA) masterplan, which is also being assessed independently by Economic Development Queensland (EDQ).

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council wanted to ensure the revitalised Weinam Creek transport hub was supported with health and other vital services for the Southern Moreton Bay Islands (SMBI) and Redland Bay communities and provided job opportunities for locals.

“The masterplan and Weinam Creek PDA Development Scheme supports the social and economic viability of the project as a coastal community and gateway to Moreton Bay and the SMBIs, stimulating island tourism and economies and enhancing public open space and services for existing and future generations,” Cr Williams said.

“We want to ensure the state and federal governments are part of this and will continue to push for commitments to utilise the precinct for services such as a satellite hospital.”

The Weinam Creek PDA project, which is managed by Redland Investment Corporation (RIC) in consultation with Council, covers about 20ha of land-based works across the existing site that will improve civic open spaces and include new retail, commercial, marine, health and public services.

“The project is now transitioning from the first stage of construction of the public carpark and residential precinct on the southern side of Weinam Creek to detailed master planning of the northern side of the Weinam Creek transport and ferry terminal,” Cr Williams said.

“As the masterplan has evolved from the conceptual to construction stages, minor changes have been made to refine the access and boundaries of the carpark to improve amenity for residents in the area. There are also slight refinements to the siting of the pedestrian bridge, boat ramp and residential zone.

“The result is a masterplan that will make a significant contribution to the community through the revitalisation of the waterfront precinct and the provision of a range of public and community infrastructure.”

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said the proposed development would deliver a high-quality mixed-use development and improved public realm for shopping, working and socialising.

“This will create an appealing, safe and vibrant hub for the mainland and Southern Moreton Bay Island communities,” he said.

“Southern Moreton Bay Island residents and commuters using the Redland Bay Marina ferry terminal will benefit from improved access to services without the need for additional transport.

“This will also fill a gap which currently exists for Redland Bay and surrounding suburbs, while creating a significant number of new jobs, especially for the area’s younger residents.”

 

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Nature-based thinking around the future of Birkdale Community Precinct


With Birkdale Community Precinct rich in protected ecology and environmental values, Redland City Council is encouraging people to consider the area’s natural assets as they imagine and share their ideas for future uses of the land.

The precinct sits within an ecological corridor along the lower Tingalpa and Coolnwynpin Creek catchments and links with a broader network of conservation reserves and protected areas, with almost two-thirds of the precinct being protected by an environmental covenant.

Mayor Karen Williams said the 62-hectare site had potential for a huge variety of community uses, providing they were respectful of the land’s ecology and environment.

“The protections mean the precinct’s habitat, wildlife and heritage will be safe and the community keeps the beautiful greenbelt we now see wrapping around the meandering Tingalpa Creek. I want to make it really clear that these areas are preserved for future generations and will be enhanced and connected to make areas of outstanding ecological importance to our wildlife,” Cr Williams said.

“That doesn’t exclude the community from being able to access and enjoy these beautiful areas in the future, as some low-impact ‘tread-lightly’ ideas that are respectful of their environment are possible. The community will always be the custodians of this protected conservation area which covers almost 40 hectares of the precinct, so how can it be best enjoyed perhaps through education and discovery opportunities?

“It brings to mind such endeavours as interactive nature walks, both day and night-time, and small scale, eco-friendly stay options, such as camping, glamping, perhaps even tree-house accommodation that help facilitate citizen science projects.

“These are just a few of the possible uses and we invite the community to help build the future by sharing their ideas for the site with us. The precinct offers wonderful opportunities for us to transform this site into an environmentally and family-friendly conservation and recreational area that we can all be proud of.”

Cr Williams said Council had undertaken extensive environmental and cultural studies and had implemented management plans for the precinct to protect its unique values.

“There is also the opportunity to enhance habitat connections throughout the site and beyond which is really how we can elevate the importance and quality of the ecology on the land beyond just a single patch,” she said.

“Some of the precinct’s areas that fall under a Community Facilities zone have minimal identified environmental values, allowing potential community uses amid the naturally wonderful environment across the precinct.”

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said one thing COVID-19 had reminded us all of was the importance of people reconnecting – with themselves and family, within nature.

“In my view, the Birkdale Community Precinct site continues to remind us of the lessons that nature has been offering well before and since European arrival,” Cr Bishop said.

“Set within ancient land and cradled in the curves of a beautiful creek, this area offers an amazing opportunity for individuals and families to reframe our appreciation of economy, ecology and land use planning, as we reconnect with bountiful ecosystems within this place.”

Lat27 director Damian Thompson said reconnecting with nature had become even more critical in recent times as we travelled less and focussed more on our own back yards.

“This site presents an incredible opportunity to connect locals and visitors alike with the unique, largely unknown ecological attributes of this stretch of Tingalpa Creek,” he said.

Mr Thompson was one of five urban design and landscape architecture teams who created ideas boards for the precinct based around themes inherent to the site. His theme was Ecology and Environment.

A June 2020 study of the site’s ecology, commissioned by Redland City Council, discovered 219 flora species on the precinct, of which 146 were considered native species, and a total of 38 fauna species.

Future uses for the area will nurture and continue protecting these flora and fauna species.

The existing native vegetation identified in the report included native foods such as brush cherry, berry saltbush, ruby saltbush, native asparagus, kangaroo grass, warrigal greens (New Zealand spinach) and wombat berry.

For more information about Council’s community consultation on your input into possible future uses for Birkdale Community Precinct, visit yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au – see expert urban designers’ ideas, watch the videos, read the fact sheets, take a virtual tour of the precinct, and have your say.

Two open days when the community will have the rare opportunity to tour the site firsthand are planned for Friday April 16 and Saturday April 17, from 10am to 4pm. Full details on yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au

Consultation closes on Tuesday 4 May 2021.

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Council tests new version of PD Online


Redland City Council’s PD Online portal is temporarily unavailable but Council hopes to have a new version online soon.

Council is testing a new version of Planning Xchange, of which PD Online is one component.

Dependent upon the outcome of testing, Council hopes to go live with this newer version of PD Online as soon as possible.

Council apologises for any inconvenience caused by PD Online going offline.

While PD Online is temporarily unavailable, residents wishing to obtain information on existing development applications can send an enquiry via email to pdonlineenquiries@redland.qld.gov.au, phone Council on 3829 8999 or visit one of Council’s Customer Contact Centres.

To obtain property information relating to zones and overlays in Red-e-Map, council has provided instructions on its PD Online webpage.

 

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Council moves to preserve local heritage places 


Redland City Council has asked the State Government for approval to add a number of local properties to its local heritage register.

Redland City Deputy Mayor Julie Talty said today’s decision followed public consultation on Council’s Heritage Major Amendment package that ran late last year.

“Today’s decision shows Council’s commitment to support our local heritage on Redlands Coast,” Cr Talty said.

“More than 300 places that contain European Heritage Values were examined by a heritage expert and in January 2019, Council made a resolution to commence the major amendment process to list priority sites to ensure that all local heritage themes identified in the City were represented.

“Today’s decision follows a 55-day public consultation period that resulted in 45 places proposed for inclusion in the Heritage Schedule.

“Almost 800 website visits and 37 submissions were received, including questions from property owners about the effect of adding their places on Schedule 7 (Heritage Schedule) of City Plan.

“Councillors have now adopted the public submission review report that was informed by submissions received during the consultation period as well as one-on-one meetings between interested property owners, Council officers and its heritage expert.

“Prior to commencement of the proposed amendment, Council will also consider an associated incentive packages to support affected property owners.”

Cr Talty said the amendment process had now reached a critical stage.

“Before any planning scheme amendment can be implemented, the Planning Minister must consider the proposal and provide approval to adopt it.

“Council will work with owners, the community and State Government in coming months in an effort to facilitate the preservation of our local heritage places.”

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New video showcases proposed Weinam Creek PDA master plan


Redland City Council has released a 3D flythrough video of the proposed Weinam Creek Priority Development Area (PDA) master plan, which is currently with the State Government for approval.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council was excited to showcase the proposed master plan and offer the community an opportunity to see the valuable infrastructure and community benefits expected from the completed project.

“The overall master plan will be delivered in stages, transforming the waterfront of Redland Bay,” she said.

“The project will provide much-needed community infrastructure for local families, improve the usability of the transport hub, attract visitors, create jobs, and drive economic development in the area.”

Council partnered with Council-owned subsidiary Redland Investment Corporation to deliver Stage 1 of the project, which was completed late last year.

This included a new footbridge and connecting pathways from the Moores Road car park to provide more direct access to the marina ferry terminal, accommodating foot traffic and bicycles as well as mobility scooters.

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said the project would include increased ground level and multi-deck car parking facilities, with a mix of short and long-term options as well as allocated disability parking.

“Other features of the proposed plan include improved drop-off and storage facilities for Southern Moreton Bay Island residents, more than 21,000 sqm of new public open space, the rejuvenation of 46,920 sqm of existing parkland, new pedestrian and cycleways and the construction of a new public boat ramp,” Cr Edwards said.

“There is also expected to be mixed use and medium-density residential development, retail and commercial spaces including cafes, restaurants and grocery outlets, as well as a health precinct for mainland and island residents.”

State Member for Redlands Kim Richards said the proposed master plan was the catalyst for transformation of the waterfront precinct and gateway to the beautiful islands.

“The project will provide important amenity to enhance and create a vibrant precinct for our growing southern Redlands mainland and island communities,” she said.

“It will drive economic development and create a spectacular waterfront destination for locals and visitors to enjoy and celebrate our unique coastal and island lifestyle.”

Redland Investment Corporation will host a series of 18 Meet the Planner sessions in the Redlands Coast Lifestyle Information Centre at the Marina Ferry Terminal between February 15 and 25.

To book a session, and to view the flythrough video of the master plan, visit Redland City Council’s Your Say page.

The master plan has been lodged with Economic Development Queensland for assessment and approval.

There will be further opportunities for public comment and submissions during a public notification period in a couple of months.

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